Amazon: Killing Workers, Avoiding Tax & Destroying the Environment

Thought it would be useful to have a thread for detailing the horrific practices of Amazon and tips for avoiding it.

That said, is boycotting Amazon a pointless affair that serves only to minimise your personal sense of guilt? Is that good enough radon to do it anyhow?

Sparked by

https://community.drownedinsound.com/t/us-politics-thread-the-crowning-of-supernintendo-biden/55294/3070?u=autumnbeech

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Used to work for them here in Cork. Absolutely horrendous employer and that was just on the phones. I refuse to buy anything from them, though a full boycott is nigh on impossible thanks to AWS.

Did work for their compliance section for a while and that was another fucking nightmare. Never seen an organisation as incompetent as that and I’ve worked in the public sector for years now.

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The text from the warehouse worker telling his partner he wasn’t allowed to leave before the tornado killed him is absolutely heart breaking.
Boycotting them does feel like such a useless tactic when if a couple hundred people turned up at Bezos’s house things would soon change.

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Haven’t bought anything from Amazon for about five years now, found it very straightforward to… just not buy anything from them.

I try not to be preachy about it, although a couple of years ago I did ask my family not to buy me anything through Amazon at Christmas. One of my sisters then took great pleasure on Christmas Day in telling me she’d bought my present through Amazon.

So yeah, my boycott isn’t exactly setting the world on fire. Would love to hear more about anything more worthwhile I can do.

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Why are people like this

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Siblings gonna sibling

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So frustrating when you buy something online, having spent the time deliberately Amazon and yet it turns up in Amazon packaging because their logistics and marketplace are everywhere.

And that’s before thinking about all the stuff that runs on their servers. I’m currently moving our work’s cloud stuff from AWS onto Azure - small fry and meaningless in the grand scheme of things but hey ho.

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My mum and I have both started putting on our Christmas lists that we’d prefer Amazon be avoided if possible. My dad got really arsey about it. It literally doesn’t even say ‘DON’T USE THEM’, just ‘please avoid if possible’. Imagine being that fragile on behalf of Jeff Bezos lol.

I don’t really do boycotts and it’s not an absolute boycott - if there’s something that I need at short notice and can’t get elsewhere, or it’s something I need that I don’t know where to get somewhere else, I’ll use it - but I’m trying not to. I got a £25 Amazon voucher for winning an award at work tho so I might use it to buy the Japanese import CD of Hot Pink by Doja Cat which is the only way you can get a CD version of the album

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Think I’ve managed to avoid buying anything from them for a fair few years now. Only having visa as my credit/debit cards means I won’t be able to soon enough anyway.

Think it’s easier though for people like me as I don’t for example have kids or extended family to buy presents for.

Is their any practical way to deal with the web services thing?

Avoid it where possible (but like pervo I’ve had to purchase things I can’t find anywhere else, even after weeks of searching online) and of course AWS is everywhere.

My stepdad is absolutely obsessed. He’s always been a shopoholic but since lockdown he has an Amazon parcel arrive almost every day.

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Not really

a friend of mine takes great delight in sending me pics of his pint and food, or the carpet, in wetherspoons all the time. I just don’t know why he bothers but it seems to keep him entertained for some reason

So much of my work is in AWS. I just got made redundant and was hoping to get away from it, turns out that I can’t really find anywhere that doesn’t use it in some form, and my experience with using it seems to be the thing a lot of recruiters are latching onto as my most marketable skills.

It’s a pain but it’s entirely possible.

I’ve not used Amazon for about eight years now, after they threatened to bankrupt the company my mother worked for because the company refused to sell their products (nursery furniture) through Amazon. I’d started to find it a little creepy that buying online was becoming synonymous with buying on Amazon anyway.

Most things - music, books, toys, electronics etc - can be bought either at the same price or cheaper elsewhere. The only thing I’ve struggled with is DVDs, though it’s very rare that I buy those nowadays.

i always recommend Blackwells for books - their online store usually seems to mirror Amazon prices and their postage is free

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I’m sure they’re not without their own massive issues, but I find eBay has almost everything I could want available as buy it now, and a good percentage of the stuff comes clearly hand packaged and with notes from small sellers, so hopefully the order fulfilment is at least being carried out more ethically.

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I like hive.co.uk, postage is usually free I think and you can pick a local bookshop to give a slice to

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Forgot about them, should give them a go

Has anyone successfully done a tour of one of their warehouses? Wonder if they just advertise them for good PR or sutin.

Someone I know worked at one briefly and their main complaint seemed to be that most of their breaktime was spent walking to or from the canteen/staff area which was miles away from where he was working.

Another guy I knew seemed to quite like it and said there was plenty of overtime at £16 an hour or something in that ballpark, so idk.

There was a Guardian long read on it a couple of years ago which basically said staff wear headsets and are alarmed when not hitting targets, which seems inhumane to me, and i imagine very, very stressful.

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We’ve been using World Of Books quite a lot recently. Postage is free, items arrive in good condition, buying second-hand feels good. It’s probably more expensive than rooting through charity shops but it’s more reliable.

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