Autumn Brexit Thread - The Yellowing

doom
getonwithitcorbyn
dooom
doooooooooom

#101

This was at school

Trying to figure out who would make the better Universities Minister ?

  • Marckee
  • Sam Gyimah
  • Gary Stringer

0 voters


#102

Yeah i’s got to be marckee, but I think he’d probably be quite terrifying.


#103

Leics. :fist:


#104

Radio 4 plays a bit of birdsong every morning. misleadingly called ‘Tweet of the day’.


#105

Just for your FYI, I was talking to a civil servant I know today whose money is currently on the idea that this is all just a massive piece of brinksmanship on the part of May, and that she’s going to expose the worst of Brexit and then pull back at the last minute. Otherwise, in his words, ‘We are fucked and it’s not a question of whether there will be civil unrest, but where it will be worst’. Cheery.


#106

What has the EU done in your area?


#107

did anyone see that shit about mogg and his bros doing a brexiteer statement of values or something where they say they want to set up a missile defense system to protect the falklands


#108

And they’re going to do it all while cutting taxes.

I believe Parappa the Rapper put it best when he said this:


#109

Apropos of this, haven’t seen one of these for aaaaggggggeeessss - and it’s a pretty good one to boot…


#110

‘Irish voters, particularly “soft” no voters, did not resent voting again because many of them felt that their first vote was uninformed. Lack of knowledge, information and understanding was cited by 42% of those who voted no first time.’


#111

Looking forward to the unveiling of the erg’s extremely well considered and clever solution to the irish border issue later.


#112

How was this achieved? The Irish government played for time at home. It turned to research to understand voter attitudes, commissioning a comprehensive academic study on the behaviour of the electorate. By September 2008, the government had solid evidence on why voters voted the way they did, and could begin to craft a strategy. Armed with the results, the Irish parliament interrogated Ireland’s future in the EU, and its deliberations led to the publication of a report titled Ireland’s Future in the European Union: Challenges, Issues and Options. While the people had spoken through a referendum, representative democracy reasserted its core role in the Irish political system and the quality of debate underlined the seriousness of the issues at stake.

At the same time, the Irish government engaged intensively with its EU partners. Neither side wanted to lose the Lisbon treaty. By December 2008, the broad outline of a deal was emerging which included the retention of one commissioner per state and legal guarantees on issues such as taxation, security and abortion. Next came the difficult task of translating this into a document. The Irish negotiators met every member state government at least twice and many three or four times between January and June 2009 to achieve agreement. On the eve of the June 2009 European council meeting, the then Irish prime minister, Brian Cowen, wrote to his counterparts saying that without legally binding guarantees he was unwilling to hold a referendum. With such guarantees, the government was prepared to go back to the electorate to ask “is this your final answer?”

For the first Lisbon referendum, RTE deployed a conflict frame akin to a Punch-and-Judy contest between yes and no, with little or no editorial intervention to challenge or correct inaccurate claims. Second time around, the conflict frame was accompanied by a responsibility frame, ie that the issue was salient and had to be taken seriously. The broadcaster took to heart its duty to accurately inform and educate.

So, in short, Ireland had politicians acted diligently and thoroughly. And the media acted in a reasonable and responsible manner.

Whereas we’ve had May being vague, David Davis turning up to half hour meeting without a pen or paper, and Corbyn basically going along with it. And a media capable of nothing but a Farage and Boris fetish coupled with general shithousery across the board.

I maintain: Brexit will be called off and the UK will be even more of a laughing stock than it already is, or the UK will deservedly disintegrate.


#113

I think the ERG’s plan today will be to effectively remove NI from the UK and have a border in the Irish sea. Rees Mogg is way more interested in Brexit than he is in maintaining the UK

If it does get called off, that’s great for the long term but the short term could be pretty interesting


#114

That would mean no DUP though


#115

That’s fine, once they force the boundary changes through they won’t need them.


#116

Am I mad to reckon they could get it through without them?


#117

Brilliant

But how are they going to keep the hordes of famine-stricken roving mercenaries from decapitating the rich & eating their brains in post-Brexit Britain though?

Drone strikes I guess


#118

That and blame immigrants.


#119

To be fair, that would be an impressively literal translation of British Exit.


#120

Depends. Think you’re right about Rees Mogg not caring but I bet there are a ton of colonialist inbreds in that group of 50 Tory MPs. You know, the kind that were writing think pieces to the effect of “the border issue is the Republic’s fault for leaving the United Kingdom”. My money’s still on them calling for the re-annexation of all Ireland :grimacing: