Bitcoin and Blockchain in 2018


#1

Thought I’d start another thread on this as things seem to be picking up after the massive sell-off at the end of last year.

Anyone got any ripple they can lend us?


#2

loooool


#3

I have heard of this (as a bad thing) but also have no idea what it is if you could marckee it for me please


#4

Are you … are you too young to know what goatse is?


#5

I think so, maybe?


#6

isn’t all of this evil? feels evil.


#7

Still dont know what bitcoin is and I intend to keep it that way


#8

Signed up to Coinbase whilst bored over Xmas but still waiting for them to verify my identity. But I realised that if idiots like me are jumping onboard who don’t even fully understand what a bitcoin is (it’s like a load of old fossilised PDF files, right?) then the ship has probably sailed long ago.


#9

Invested about £30k in Karipsa over the last year and if it all goes to plan i’ll be the Chinese Deputy Manager of Finance by September.


#10

#国王自卸车


#11

打赌大,赢大


#12

#13

Excusable.

But I’m astonished that Rory Cellan-Jones wouldn’t be aware of Goatse. He’s been the BBCs tech correspondent for over a decade.

(Edit: link is pretty much SFW, btw.)


#14

Was gonna invest a few hundred in Ark and Iota when the last thread appeared and when Iota was about 50c but didn’t and then it increased 8 fold.
Shouldawouldacoulda


#15

I did read an interesting thing about how these and normal financial transactions are produced by existing servers doing complex equation “work” to generate “value” to the coins themselves. And that this will contribute to environmental oblivion by using so much electricity. :joystick:


#16

Yeah, I think it’s now completely unviable to try to mine them yourself. In this country, anyway.


#17

I think decentralized currency does have some emancipatory potential.

There are plenty of anti-government/libertarians conspiracy theorists involved at this point as well unfortunately and bitcoin mining is for sure too energy intensive to be sustainable.


#18

i thought i understood these things now but that’s proper baffled me… how can the government make a decentralised currency? how can it be tied to real commodities? ahhhh.


#19

In fairness that was a poor example not least because Maduro hasn’t actually outlined how it would work.

What’s more interesting is that cryptocurrencies have allowed people in Venezuela to bypass the restrictions on the Bolivar.


#20

Can Bitcoin be a con?!