Blur - Wembley 8 July

I take it Alex’s farm isn’t doing too great

6 Likes

The thing about high prices for in demand events is that the promoters don’t care because they don’t need to care. If it will sell out regardless of price, it’s not their problem whether it’s people hitting up a credit card with money they can’t afford, or rich people only. I feel the same about that as I do about landlords. They charge a huge amount, but it’s not their problem as it’s the first thing that comes out of your account when you’ve been paid - how you cope with the vastly reduced amount of spare money for the rest of the month isn’t their problem.

Incidentally, I don’t include Glastonbury in this. I understand why it costs what it does, having been there so often, and stlll think it represents excellent value for money.

1 Like

Really like her, am pleased she’s doing well and can absolutely see why she’s touring so much while her profile is high caveats aside, this is a superb bit of phrasing :grinning:

6 Likes

This sold out in minutes.

Second date added on July 9th

When you do something in such a way that demand outstrips supply, you can seemingly charge what you like now. I could be wrong but I’m sure this must have a knock-on effect on smaller gigs. For a lot of people, that’s the fun budget blown for a bit.

1 Like

Yep. Big acts on a nostalgia trip can (clearly) charge whatever they want and will sell out.

For the price of these Blur shows, I’d rather go see 5+ smaller bands or nearly 10 rowdy nights upstairs at the Black Heart, for some metal band I’ve likely never heard of but bound to enjoy.

Not sure I have a point really, beyond I can’t blame bands for charging what they are now (I bit for Pulp in Finsbury Park after all), just that it all seems a bit excessive amid the economic death spiral the UK has found itself in…

2 Likes

agree but I wonder if for at least a chunk of the audience that budget was never gonna go on smaller gigs - just means they’ll miss out on other big gigs or fancy theatres nights etc, rather than them cutting out 8 gigs of up and coming bands

3 Likes

Yeah I imagine a big percentage of people going to this or Pulp are in the “one or two big gigs a year” demographic now anyway and that money wouldn’t have ever found its way to the Moth Club or Cafe Oto or whatever.

I have two people in my office that got Blur tickets and I haven’t heard them talk about going to anything live music wise other than the occasional arena gig. A huge portion of the country consumes music and culture in a totally different way to people on eg DiS.

1 Like

Yeah, I think you’re right and I genuinely did think this before posting. Only the fact that prices have gotten this ridiculous made me even think to post it at all. Something will give for many people if they forked out for this, but you’re right that for most it probably wasn’t ten gigs at the Dublin Castle.

I was also a bit wary that I might have sounded judgmental. A lot of people going to this will be in their mid 40s with young kids and probably not going out that often, and I’m not saying “people who go to big gigs don’t care”… I’ve got two stadium gigs booked for 2023. It’s more my annoyance at the people who now charge such ridiculous amounts for gigs. I know they’re expensive to put on and don’t want people cutting corners, but surely this is too much if we just use previous prices as a yardstick and account for inflation.

These points are very true. I can look at these prices and be stunned, but then when I think about, I realise that I go to 1 gig a week on average, with tickets usually being £10-25. Someone who goes to see two or three massive arena gigs in a single year will still be paying much less than I do, and they’ll get near-guaranteed memorable spectacle for their cash.

Which isn’t to say that these big arena prices aren’t tough to stomach. I hate that it makes pop concerts less accessible to teenagers (particularly ones who aren’t middle-class), granted that’s part of wider issues in the industry and, I assume, not really applicable to a Blur gig!

1 Like

Did anyone get tickets?

covered above

Yeah. Feel bad about it because of the Coxon allegations, but my best mate from uni is coming to London for the first time in five or six years and I want to see him and frankly I still love the band as a whole, even if they’re mostly insufferable/awful people.

Fandom, eh.

1 Like

On the other hand, the big arena tours tend to play in more places than the mid sized tours. Kendrick Lamar came to Newcastle. Run the Jewels (as a really basic equivalent with I expect a shared fanbase) didn’t. Kendrick may have cost more, but it didn’t involve travel and hotels and that extra layer of organisation.

1 Like

In Blur and Pulp’s case, it’s the mid-tier tours that’ll suffer. I’d probably go to five or six Brixton/Kentish Town/Koko/The Garage level shows each year, a combination of current and nostalgia acts, but this year it’ll have to be special and very well priced for me to go now I’ve committed to those summer gigs.

1 Like

Dublin

1 Like

80 Euro.
Same supports as the Wembley show too.

So B-Roads leaked after having been sat on for twenty seven years. It’s… surprisingly poignant! I expected a few lairy cancellable bits but it’s nothing like that. There’s a sadness to it all, clearly they’ve been chastened by the realisation that being huge isn’t all it’s cracked up to be, and they appear much more honest and serious than you might remember, throughout. Damon’s comment about the rings in the hotel were a bit of a choker.

The fact that it’s shot on film is nice little bonus too.

Sorry, what’s this now?

1 Like