Book thread 2018 📚


#441

got the war nerd iliad through this morning. absolutely lovely cover design, also really like the idea of someone taking a greek epic and making it understandable for the common man, such as myself:


#442

Almost finished ‘Meddling Kids’ by Edgar Cantero, it reads a little like an extended episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer but it’s quite enjoyable and there are some very thinly veiled references to Lovecraft, b-movie slashers and native American folklore in there too.

I also like the fact that it touches on many of the themes inherent in weird fiction, cosmic pessimism the supernatural etc but in a way that’s readily accessible.


#443

A pal put me onto this book a few years ago, it’s amazing. I’ve since pointed loads of folk in its direction and they’ve all loved it.


#444

Such a beautiful book with nothing happening.


#445

It is beautiful, although I wouldn’t characterise it as ‘nothing happening’.

Admittedly I’m only 70 pages in but already it describes the profound psychological impact WW1 had on American society.

It’s beautifully paced. Almost languid, like Stoner himself.


#446

Languid is spot on.


#447

Reading the order of time, even though it is illustrated with smurfs it is still above my head, so far I gather time exists because heat can only go in one direction


#448

Remarkable book that, I’d like to read it again


#449

Finished the last 200 pages of Stoner in one sitting. Just couldn’t put it down!

An absolute masterpiece. Up until recently, it has to be considered one the most over-looked American novels of the late 20th century. Thankfully now it’s receiving the praise it initially deserved. The characterisation of William Stoner is so understated, mirroring the man himself. It’s compassionate, sympathetic. It’s a wonderful example of ‘quiet writing’ that illustrates the universal subjects of lost potential, regret, anxieties, fears, lost love.

A Beautiful novel. I massively recommend it.


#450

I also just finished this and have similar felings
reading Handmaids Tale while watching the series now


#451

Rereading Bleeding Edge. Seemed like the right time bc of all that mad tech industry shite in the news and a new season of Silicon Valley


#452

Stunning book. :+1:


#453

I managed to read Handmaid’s Tale, The Power by Naomi Alderman and It Can’t Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis all in a row, and then followed it up with watching the TV version of HT. I think I’m a little burned out dystopian stuff for a while now …


#454

Maybe you need a bit of nostalgic escapism, there’s this book called 1984 by George Orwell which sounds like a real hoot. Haven’t read it but I assume it’s all about high concept American films and FM synthesis


#455

Reading it now, halfway through in 2 days so a solid sunny day read. Enjoying most of it, feel the African village thing is a bit forced/not so persuasively written


#456

There was something I really liked about that whole bit but she seemed to lose interest before she finished.


#457

Just got to this absolute gem of a passage in Nothing is True… and I really needed to share it:


#458

The Water Cure is out in two weeks. Looking forward to it but also a bit of trepidation as I know the author (like I guess a bunch of DiS people) through others and I don’t want to find out I don’t like it.

(I read a book by someone I know via a geek group on FB a year or so back and ended up really enjoying it. Reviewed it favourably but anonymously on Amazon and then was amused to find her mention a line from it in passing on another post.)


#459

Read Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng. Started yesterday and read it all in 24 hours.

Loved Everything I never told you, this was very much in the same vein and similarly absolutely great. Families, America, culture, jealousy and repressed emotions.

:+1::+1::+1:


#460

Just finished The Power. I thought it was an enjoyable enough read but it’s a little light weight. I wasn’t expecting it to be quite such a straight-forward ‘what if?’ without any real exploration of the themes. If not for some of the more graphic content it’d fall straight under the YA category.