Book thread 2018 📚


#521

Any good modern thrillers out there?

I just finished You by Caroline Kepnes and I loved it so want something like that?


#522

I’m not sure about reading it for fun exactly :grin:, I’m still sorting through some of the concepts that he comes up with.

It’s not so much because they’re difficult in and of themselves but, I’d guess in a similar fashion to Kant large portions of it rely on propositions established near the beginning of the book which he then uses as axioms for propositions that occur later on.

That said, in a strange way I think trying to grapple with his methods has helped make philosophy overall slightly less opaque.


#523

I picked What it means when a man falls from the sky by Lesley Nneka Arimah as my book club pick. Have any of you read it? Being the picker is really stressful. Everyone seems super busy so I thought short stories would be s sensible choice.


#524

I’d be interested to hear more about future duras books (had been interested in duras - and compton-burnett too, especially a house and its head, for that matter - for a while, and never got around to reading any, then forgot.)


#525

yeah will update here when I read it probably. I also got another compton-burnett thing - the present and the past. might attempt to read wolf solent next, so we’ll see how that goes.

I also read patrick modiano - missing person. it’s about a private detective investigating… himself. because he’s got amnesia. it’s good, very evocative, etc, though I’m not a massive fan of the amnesiac device - even though I guess it thematically resonant here. truly a meditation on memory, identity and loss.


#526

Not read it. In my last book club I picked once, and people seemed to like it (thank god). In a new group and I’ve picked the same book. Hopefully they like it too.


#527

I went to an event where she was signing books and the guy next to me got three and made her sign AND date them, lol. He knows where his bread is buttered!

Like @1101010 I was worried I might not enjoy it, but gawd I didn’t need to. It was wonderful.

Funnily enough I read The Power just before and then reading reviews many of the more negative ones compared The Water Cure unfavourably. But apart from them being primarily about women and there being an environmental upset I don’t think they’re comparable? One is a hugely scoped, worldwide dystopia and the other is a quiet, intimate portrayal of one family’s attempt to cope with a changing world. I enjoyed both books for different reasons.


#528

I got Delta of Venus but couldn’t get past the first tale which involved child abuse :confused:


#529

I only managed to finish Seven Surrenders last week so I’m only about a quarter of the way through but I’m really enjoying it a lot :slight_smile:


#530

Did you read Exquisite? I reckon that fits the bill.


#531

I’m after a fun page-turner for holiday if anyone has any good recommendations. I tend to like things like Hemingway, thrillers, JLC, american literature/beat etc, not really into fantasy.

Thanks in advance!


#532

Jim Dodge’s Stone Junction is the best American road novel you’ve (probably) never read. It does have trace elements of mysticism, but don’t worry about them.

(Amazon link for the purposes of checking out the reviews, feel free to buy it from somewhere else!)


#533

This is hilarious - I think the cover says it’s Bukowski writing Confederacy of Dunces but that’s not really accurate. Genuinely one of my favourite books.


#534

I’m really interested in this.


#535

Nearly finished The Big Sleep. I still don’t think it’s resonates with me as the stuff I like that’s influenced by it (Pynchon, Murakami, yer more haunting and weird noir, etc.) but I’m definitely getting more and more in the groove of it, if that makes sense.

One thing that’s striking me weirdly more than anything else is being weirdly moved by Marlowe, despite being yer standard hardboiled detective, trying to keep General Sternwood from hearing the full extent of all the bleakness and that.

What do other people think about Chandler?


#536

I loved Stone Junction so much. I zoomed through it.


#537

He’s excellent. I like very little crime fiction (even other hard-boiled canon) but I love Chandler. He is so classy.

The Lady In The Lake is the most fun Marlow novel but would recommend The Long Goodbye too. Farewell, My Lovely has some amazing paragraphs but the story isn’t up to much.


#538

I think I find with crime sorta stuff, it can be 50/50 whether they’re on the same page as me in terms of finding the atmosphere of pure mystery (how characters respond to it, how it effects the world, etc.) way more interesting than the actual solution to it. I think it’s why I like Lynch so much


#539

I generally don’t care who dunnit but Chandler writes some beautiful phrases.

If you get the hardboiled but classy bug, try The Yiddish Policeman’s Union by Michael Chabon too.


#540

Been meaning to read Chabon for donkeys so this is a good shout