Brexit Thread IV - Negotiations begin (and we're all screwed)


#661

Problem asking for an extension, which is the only reasonable course of action is going to lead to a massive backlash at this point.

Brexiters would rather see our economy fall of a cliff swear down.


#662

Some of the comments underneath from Brexiters are utterly deluded, too. They are completely detached from reality.


#663

It keeps coming back to the same thing: whether the self-interested, non-insane Tories are willing to destroy their party in order to save the country. We’re fucking doomed.


#664

#665

Good thing the government are in a great place to negotiate right now what with having a solid cabinet and all…oh wait.


#666

#667

sounds like if things don’t basically get sorted in this round of talks, the world collapses


#668

imagine how different things would be without tabloids. imagine.


#669

Are they thick or fucking stupid? Not a single one of those cunts knows how to fix this because it cannot be fixed. They imposed partition and are now trying to blame our government for the issues arising from their idiotic decisions. Fuck off.

(Not directed at you @kiyonemakibi!)


#670

GOOD ONE


#671

that few?


#672

“The study, carried out by the British Medical Association, also found that almost half of the health service’s 12,000 medics from the European Economic Area were considering moving abroad.”

:+1:t3:


#673

The UK is lucky that our foreign language teaching is so poor in this country, because otherwise you’d also see lots more UK-trained doctors (and nurses, midwifes, dental practitioners, pharmacists, architects and veterinary surgeons) heading to the EU as it recognises all of those professional qualifications.

English-speaking countries (eg US, Australia, New Zealand, Canada), require re-validation. Maybe Ireland will become the destination of choice, if it isn’t sucked into a civil war as a result of the border issues.


#674

Ireland is absolutely crying out for nurses and doctors, as all our graduates leave for the UK, Australia or the Middle East. Unsure as to how easily UK workers would find employment here if they weren’t EU citizens but I’m sure a workaround could be found.

Re: your civil war comment, it won’t get to that. I would expect something resembling the Troubles but not a full out civil war.


#675

was there a massive economic disparity between NI & the Republic during The Troubles? Because there’s bound to be one after Brexit as Ireland benefits hugely & the UK goes into recession


#676

The mutual recognition thing was driven by the professional associations, and I can’t see any of them abandoning that, especially as they’ll be worried about a brain drain. I can’t see the RoI putting up barriers to non-EU UK people coming to work in their country if, as you say, they’re crying out for trained practitioners.


#677

The Republic was very poor until it joined the EEC in 1973 - don’t forget it was effectively a colony and had been treated as such to the extent that it wasn’t far off what we would understand as a developing country at the time.


#678

sure, but I’m thinking that the RoI economy post-brexit should get a huge boost & the NI one take a big hit - that’s a whole different economic dynamic to what existed before

plus the border will be some kind* of EU land border and so in many ways be a much more amplified and significant thing in the wider context. Think how much propaganda emphasis was put on Calais in the whole ‘immigration crisis’ bullshit narrative & transfer that to …I dunno… Dundalk

Also, my mum’s side of the family came over to Britain from rural Ireland in the great post-war wave of economic migration. Could we see that wave moving back the other way?

so many variables

*though literally no one knows what kind


#679

So much of RoIreland’s trade is with the UK that their economy will take a big hit too.

Long-term I would think that they will take a lot of the financial sector from the UK (if they can win over those who want to relocate to Frankfurt), but they’ll still have to completely reconfigure their economy as well.

No other remaining EU country will be as adversely affected by Brexit as the RoIreland’s will.


#680

Spot on marckee.

Ah, good point, and one I hadn’t considered.