Can someone explain where we at with Brexit?

What does this mean for the tories? Does their majority getting smaller threaten them in any real way?

I’m at this stage

Not really. They’ll storm the by-election if they field a candidate. Also they’ve got some level of confidence and supply deal going on with the DUP so they’ve sort-of got a working majority of c.24 or something in the Commons when all’s said and done.

Ah well. Hopefully the resignations hurt their image slightly anyway.

A combination of the first 4. Never 5.

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What if other Tories were to follow suit? (I’m not saying they will, I’m just curious)
If 10 or more Tories were to resign en masse now, they’d have no majority. That could theoretically trigger a vote of no confidence and a general election, couldn’t it?
Out of 320-odd Tory MPs, there must be around 10 or more feel broadly similar to Stephen Phillips, too.
CONSTITUTIONAL CRISIS

puts the stacey dooley thing into context

ADVANTAGE CORBYN.

Yeah we shall see.

Looks likely there’ll be a GE next year anyway for Theresa May to bolster her majority. Under no evidence or metric which currently exists is there any suggestion that Labour won’t be trounced. Although if the Lib Dems become resurgent (stranger things have happened) then this could hamper the Tories a bit.

Hell of a chance of a Progressive Alliance if Jeremy Corbyn and ‘Don’t Know’ get their shit together.

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I’ve historically always had faith in Dunno.

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#Vote Noone 2017

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Yeah how many illegal wars has Don’t Know led us into???

Yeah, I don’t want there to be a general election any time soon. But it definitely seems like it would only take a relatively small number of MPs to trigger one.

Reckon the Lib Dems would take quite a few seats off the Tories in a GE, especially standing on a Remain ticket. But, yeah, the Tories would still win easily

Guys, I made a shit photo thing of the Daily Mail headline, and I don’t know where else to put it.

Just realised the Film was called Enemy of the State, which makes it even worse.

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The thing is right, Jeremy Corbyn has found himself in a position of being pretty well placed to do well in a snap GE post-Brexit. He’s well up for leaving, just doesn’t wish to do so on Conservative terms. If the Tories prove to be both dysfunctional and rabid in their antics in the lead up to a GE then a Labour leader of his persuasion should be able to galvanise a lot of support you’d have thought.

Although given that Brexit seems to be the ultimate faultline in the electorate at the moment, you do wonder how the disconnection between himself and his core support (which is mostly fervently pro-Remain) would play out. Doesn’t seem to have been much made of it tbf.

There won’t be a general election for a while. Firstly, I don’t think Theresa May would have the majority to repeal the fixed term parliament act, as the remainer Tories will know that she’d just be doing it to marginalise them. Secondly the Tories are in just as a precarious state as Labour. Both parties have voter bases who are completely divided on the issue. The Tories’ MPs, though, are equally divided. I don’t know the demographics exactly but afaik the views of Tory MPs on Brexit don’t necessarily cohere with their constituencies.

There’s a real chance that the party could split imo. And when the situation is that precarious, the most likely outcome is probably some kind of stasis, unless May thinks she can wipe out remainer MPs relatively painlessly.

Where are we with Brexit?

Pro-democracy supporters asking for a military coup.

You wouldn’t need to do that:

Section 2 of the Act also provides for two ways in which a general election can be held before the end of this five-year period:[2]

If the House of Commons resolves “That this House has no confidence in Her Majesty’s Government”, an early general election is held, unless the House of Commons subsequently resolves “That this House has confidence in Her Majesty’s Government”. This second resolution must be made within fourteen days of the first.

If the House of Commons, with the support of two-thirds of its total membership (including vacant seats), resolves “That there shall be an early parliamentary general election”.

So a 2/3 majority of the house could call it but it does seem unlikely they’d want to.

It seems the Lords will have a say too from what I’ve read? They’re loose cannons so who can say.