DADSNET - new forum/newborn (doesn't even rhyme)


#1883

Baby led weaning was easier than I was expecting - went for a different type of vegetable mash each day for a couple of weeks and then started adding to the rotation. Mostly judt tried to keep it relaxed and fun and to not worry about how much was actually going in - to start with it is more about how to eat and introducing tastes. I had R starting to sit in his highchair for a week or two before he started food to get him used to it and also gave him a spoon to play with and get used to.

I was really scared to start but quickly realised there wasn’t much to be worried about. Ice tube and portion trays are your friends. Also this website is absolutely brilliant:
https://www.firststepsnutrition.org/eating-well-infants-new-mums
…and I found the purple Ella’s Kitchen First Foods cookbook pretty good too, finished with my copy now so I can send it to you if you want?


#1884

Was debating this (is a joint present for a 6yo and his dad), but wondered if it’d be too much for him. :thinking:


#1885

We used got a Babybjorn high chair. Second hand, cos they’re dead expensive (and most of Jimbo’s stuff is second hand)

We started Jimbo on baby rice on his six month birthday, and moved very quickly (like within a day or two) to pureed food, and never looked back really.


#1886

It’s a bit much for F (5.5 yrs) but she can play it. You know, enjoyable but you prompt her a bit?

Sorry is basically Ludo with much more fun so check that if you don’t know it.


#1887

Used to play a lot of Sorry as a kid. Used to love that.


#1888

Actually she must have started playing Carcassonne in January when I got it as a present and she was 5 in April, so I think a 6 year old would find it easier to play. Mainly it’s just the tactics you need to help them a bit with. I always play badly with her but it’s still quite compelling even so.


#1889

This is my experience too.


#1890

I gave R mashed potato made with his usual milk on day 1 and he had such a smile on his face when he had his first bit :blush:

Also, looking back at pictures I started letting him take his own spoon within a few days, very messy but totally worth it.


#1891

Don’t join a BLW Facebook group. They’re militant.
“I gave x some soup today”
“Oh really. How did you do that out of interest?”
“Fed them with a spoon (because it’s soup and they’re 6 months old)”
“Sorry you’re out of the group. BLW means never feeding them or helping them EVER. That’s just the way it is. Byeeeee”

That sort of stuff is on there regularly. People are dorks.


#1892

This makes me feel I should clarify: when I say I started giving R his own spoon really early, I mean he had a spoon but I also had one and did most of the putting stuff in his mouth for a long time (still occasionally feed him, but mostly just to get him to eat things he is less keen on, get him started and then he takes over).


#1893

I ended up doing a lot more feeding than I planned to and she’s still a lazy sod now and would happily have me feed her at every meal :see_no_evil:


#1894

Took me a while to crack it with R, it was only really when we moved out of the highchair in the summer that he started really doing it by himself. Also he really took to finger food, so still prefers using his hands - has got used to not picking up really inappropriate stuff like cereal and pasta, but still have a loosing battle for him to not be picking up some things he should really be using his fork for.


#1895

That sounds pretty straightforward - was planning on giving her mashed or steamed versions of whatever veg we were eating. Will try giving Luna a spoon to play with, she was in the kitchen while I was chopping veg yesterday and was hitting her teether against the table the same way I was chopping so hopefully will pick it up quickly!

We actually have a copy of the Ella’s Kitchen Cookbook we were given when she was born so will dig it out and have a read through the website you recommended too. Thanks :slight_smile:


#1896

Was looking at the Ikea one, thought it was too good to be true but seems to be the hyped highchair of choice!


#1897

No I’d massively recommend it. Being easy to clean is really important. Also pretty transportable and only takes a second to pop the legs on/off. You’ll find that loads of cafes and places will have them.


#1898

Am yet to read any studies that definitively conclude BLW has any benefits tbh. Wife is on board and does it/did it with both. I’m not really. Find the mess horrendous, nothing seems to go in, just all over the floor. So when I’m feeding mashed up avocado, I’m spoon feeding. Works well for finger foods and that, but the rest…nope


#1899

Adding my tuppence worth to the ikea high chair - so easy to keep clean.

As for BLW, we did it with both of ours and I’d highly recommend it. Yes, it can be messy but the idea of making entirely separate mashed up food for the kids seems like more work than a bit of a wipe up etc. Plus the fight of trying to get them to accept a spoon of goo that I wouldn’t eat myself seems a bit unnecessary. But… every child is different and we never really had any worries about ours getting enough food - they liked to eat, so having them help themselves was fine, even with one having some food intolerances.


#1900

Ah, we actually just got rid of our Ikea high chair. We had this one - was pretty decent. Worth getting the inflatable thing.

https://www.ikea.com/gb/en/products/chairs-stools-benches/high-chairs/blåmes-highchair-with-tray-black-art-50165079/


#1901

Oh man, totally. Is there any aspect of raising a child that doesn’t attract these sort of idiots?


#1902

Another vote for Davidoff Cool Ikea Antilop.