DiS meat eaters


#141

haha! She’s a strong willed girl. I admire that and you should nurture it, But honestly, mealtimes need to work for everybody in the family and that includes you and L. We got fed up being ruled my a small chubby sticky fisted dictator and I got mean. The methodology is not perfect, but he knows now that he gets what I put down or just a boring snack later (he gets toast at nursery as a morning snack so it’s not like it’s a treat he;'s holding out for.)


#142

And then they asked for edamame.

No they didn’t


#143

Stir-fry’s are fucking muck.

I mean breaded chicken, as in the pic. I’d never fry that, it’d absorb all the fat.


#144

I’d say it’s more like someone who can’t play a guitar still knowing what a Strat looks like.


#145

Yeah but what about your son? :wink:

I’ll look into these methods cheers


#146

There’s got to be the beginnings of at least three jokes in here.


#147

Mate, chicken kievs are just nuggets writ large, with garlic instead of ketchup as a desperate attempt to prove to yourself you’re an adult

Doesn’t matter if it’s whole breast, bumholes/eyelids or artisanal Kobe chicken, it’s still a massive nugget and it will be fantastic regardless


#148

Hard to argue with this line.

I mean I’m tempted, but… no, hard to argue with this line.


#149

There is a MASSIVE difference between ‘made out of a chicken fillet’ and ‘made with chicken breast’. The texture is completely different and it’s also obvious from the cost. Costs about £3? Chicken fillet. Four for £2? Probably not.

Granted the wording used on the packaging does invite confusion between ‘made using chicken breast’ because it can sound like it’s made using a whole fillet.


#150

I’ve got a lot of sympathy for the “give them the food and let them eat it or not” line (despite having no experience raising kids whatsoever), but I do find the line about them ending up eating it if they’re hungry enough a bit troubling.

I used to love my mum’s cooking when I was a kid, but I hated my school dinners (probably because they weren’t my mum’s cooking). So I often came out of the school dinner queue with virtually nothing on my tray. Often I would eat one sausage roll for my lunch. Once I came out with just a glass of water. Not healthy and it got fixed, but kids can be REALLY stubborn if they want to be, even to the extent of starving themselves to make a point.


#151

Can you stop taking my posts from this morning and making them better and more reasonable please?


#152

look i’m 29 years old and if i’m hungry enough, i’ll pretty much eat anything

do i want it? no
would i rather have something else? yes
but i’m hungry so i’m eating it


#153

The idea is that you don’t just put down something which you know they don’t like or which is 100% new. You always have something (like a bowl of fruit or some bread and butter) on hand for them to have if the main dish is snubbed.
So much of eating is psychology led rather than taste led- however taste is important too and nobody is suggesting you serve tripe or something that’s an acquired taste (foul)


#154

Yep I can relate. Although to be honest I’m genuinely not sure if I’m the same.


#155

Yeah absolutely. And I wasn’t suggesting that it’s a flawed strategy, just as you say one that requires thinking through properly.


#156

Definitely. And when it’s night 4 in a row where your child has had noting but a biscuit and garlic bread for dinner, you start to question whether you ought to be pinning him down and doing gavage of kale. I’ve just found it’s the best strategy of a bad bunch.


#157

(the former, not the gavage thing :joy::rofl:)


#158

Granted I didn’t know shallow frying breaded chicken was even possible.

Have a word wit yourself! Depends what you put in it, doesn’t it? That’s a bit like saying ‘food’s fucking muck’.


#159

I was backing you up bro!

It’s annoying because it’s so much more expensive but if I ate any of that reformed stuff I’d probably be sick.


#160

Literally don’t think I could keep fish or meat down.

Some stuff you just don’t like.

I was a very fussy sort of kid for eating. And I recall my uncle being of the view I was that way because I hadn’t been told I had to eat things. My cousin, she would eat loads of stuff you see. Then my uncle had a second kid and that boy just loved baked beans. I sort of saw the realisation come to him that you can’t force kids to like stuff really, not and be progressive.