Do you like your voice?


#1

Standard answer here is no…but I’m hoping that people who are more familiar with their voice (from a third person perspective) might be more tolerant of themselves.

What goes into voices you like/dislike? Have a problem with inflections, unfortunately, so most american accents


#2

My voice is okay…if ever so slightly high in pitch. I like its Yorkshire/BBC blend…but that often means I get misplaced.


#3

I dunno, it’s okay, I guess. I don’t hear it that often obviously.


#4

Nope, hate it. stupid accent, lazy speech. Would prefer to never hear my own voice again tbh


#5

God no.

I’m okay with hearing myself talk until I hear my voice on any recording at which point I detest it.


#6

I don’t mind my voice - but it always surprises me when I hear it. What it sounds like in my head is completely different to the reality.


#7

I’m quite nasal which I initially recoil from when I hear myself recorded, but then it’s also quite deep a lot of the time which is good. Also I seem to tend to listen to kinda nasal singers, so maybe I secretly love it.

I want more gravel but without the hard living required.


#8

Don’t mind it really.

I nearly got involved in Twitter beef this morning at someone complaining that a woman with a Minnesotan accent has “an annoying voice” and they should be using someone with a “neutral accent” for coverage, but I closed Twitter and took some deep breaths instead.


#9

it is difficult when someone has an voice you find really grating and you have to master yourself to stop judging them for something so ridiculous


#10

Literally every day for me, living in Sarf East England.

Bristol, on the other hand, was an endless delight. Cheers drive!


#11

It’s pretty nasal and annoying tbh. I love people’s fake phone voice though, mine goes all high pitched and professional sounding :joy:


#12

Absolutely more tolerant of it now than I used to be, genuinely used to think my voise was sooo much worse than everyone else’s. But I’ve become used to talking in front of (sometimes quite large) groups of people, and become more aware of how to use my voice in those settings — which transfers to other settings as well.

I also have to listen to my own voice relatively often: I interview people for articles, and I record the interviews and then listen back to it to transcribe it later. Obviously some things still annoy me, like when I’m trying to be funny or something :upside_down_face::upside_down_face: But again, I’ve become more aware of my own voice and what it actually sounds like. Also realised over the years that people have all sorts of voices and there’s nothing uniquely bad about mine, lol.


#13

Hate it. Recorded some podcasts recently and I’ve not been able to edit them yet cause I hate myself.


#14

What’s kind of interesting is that the pitch of my voice actually changes a bit depending on whether I’m speaking English or Norwegian! I think it’s slightly deeper in Norwegian iirc


#15

I don’t mind my own, could be better, could be worse.

Everyone I’ve met from here has had an excellent voice/accent!! @rich-t I’m looking at you.


#16

Is there a psychological or evolutionary reason why people hate their own voices? I mean, it’s pretty much the same for everyone to an extent, which makes me wonder if it’s beneficial somehow.


#17

I dunno. I assume the OP meant about when you hear them back recorded and so I’d guess it’s because you sound different in your head and maybe hear more issues with your speech you didn’t pick up when you were talking and concentrating on what to say?


#18

In hunter/gatherer time periods, speaking out loud would alert prey/predators, so our voices sound irritating in order to minimise noise.


#19

You don’t notice it as you’re talking though, only when it’s played back after recording


#20

Prehistoric humans would hear their voice echo on the cave walls, and would be disgusted by it.