Feminist article share thread


#1

Same rules as the old one.

  1. share stuff you’ve read recently that you’ve found interesting or think people should know about and give a little description.
  2. if you think you might start complaining about the thread or derail it with your shite, then just don’t read or post in it.
  3. try not to share stuff that’s particularly graphic or horrific without giving warning.

Feminist article share thread vol III
Feminist Article Share vol II
#2

Tagged the thread “cunts” cause that’s what my first post is going to be about.

I saw this article about the 3D model of a clitoris.

It talks about the so-called “myth” of the vaginal orgasm (see Koedt’s 1970 famous essay on the topic.

Personally I don’t think the two are necessarily in contradiction.

I also came across this website/app about orgasms if you will excuse the pun heehehe:


#3

good to see this back, thanks. some interesting stuff popped up in the last one. Too much talk of sexy bits ^ to read at work though!

I don’t unfortunately have anything to add right now…but at some point maybe.


#4

I blurred the image to make it sfw :innocent:


#5

Blurry Clitoris
£5 on door, £4 with flyer
8pm
Hoxton Kitchen


#6

very considerate! although i think it may look ruder through the blur! haha.

This new forum really is magical.


#8

do you have anything to add about why this could be seen as feminist?


#9

I don’t agree with a couple of points in this article (though not in a “lol safe space” way or anything to do with that". Struggling to articulate why though.


#10

what do you not agree with? it kinda just sounds like ian mcewan’s foetus who hates safe spaces.


#11

@DarwinBabe well these two things really;

" It’s not always OK if a straight white woman writes the story of a queer Indigenous man, because when was the last time you heard a queer Indigenous man tell his own story?"
Here it feels that she is saying that the story of an indigenous queer man would just be that and nothing more? Also, if it was an indigenous queer man telling his own story, than that wouldn’t be fiction would it?

Further on she says;
" The opening of a city’s writers festival could have been graced by any of the brilliant writers and thinkers who challenge us to be more. To be uncomfortable."
But the writer of the article WAS challenged and made to feel uncomfortable, thats what the introduction to the article is saying - and she chose to walk away from being challenged and made to feel uncomfortable.

But again, I don’t want to sound like I’m sticking up or agreeing with Lionel Schriver - just thought it might be an interesting article share. I’d like to know your thoughts on it.


#12

what about the thousands of white men who’ve been writing stories about other white men for hundreds of years? fiction, no?

the whole argument’s surely that people shouldn’t be orientalising others for the sake of money/fame? i didn’t read it as saying that people can only write what they know - just that there needs to be more sensitivity/recognition that this is happening; and that this happening cannot be allowed to silence others’ tellings of similar stories.


#13

Well, that would depend if the story was fictional, I guess?


#14

taking ‘own story’ as a completely literal meaning narrows the conversation hugely. the whole point she’s making is that it’s easy for writers like lionel shriver (who is privileged and has the power to influence discourse) to push for this ‘freedom of expression’ without thinking about (or ever having to suffer) the consequences of where this leads.


#15

It’s clearly the wrong way to interpret that because, as Jordan pointed out originally, it makes the statement an impossible contradiction. It must mean own in the sense of “writing what you know”


#16

thought this was a good response to the story:

I think both pieces had some truth in them: to start policing fiction would be pretty sad and counter productive like Shriver says, but on the other hand cultural appropriation is a problem and writers need to be knowledgable and respectful of their subject matter

Shriver was being deliberately obnoxious and says some silly things but I think there are some good points in there (just submerged in the arrogance)


#17

It’s not an article but may be of interest /use to people reading this thread: all female plumbers


#18

I don’t think it “must” be read that way, but I can see what you mean, sure. However there is an obvious contradiction in the other thing I brought up; saying there should be a platform given to writers who challenge and make you feel uncomfotable, when leaving a speech because you’ve been made to feel uncomfortable.


#19

idk, I see countless academics, writers, and public figures who all seem to be making related points.

I don’t think it’s possible to salvage anything from their critiques. they seem to base them on such wild misunderstandings of ‘identity politics’ it’s like they’re actually just being disrespectful as well as conservative.


#20

I mean this is a process of conflating critique and contestation with ‘policing’, censorship and stifling of creativity etc. Can see why people would walk out.


#21

For that I think the point is that people making you feel uncomfortable because they are being regressive teaches you nothing. Whereas a person of colour (say) making me question how often I accept society’s racism results in feeling uncomfortable but has the capacity to make me change positively.