Fuck it, lets do it too... this is Paulo's top 107 albums OF ALL TIME!

97: Mogwai - Mr Beast (2006)

Came out at the peak of my interest in post rock. Picked it up on CD whilst visiting Scotland (not Glasgow, unfortunately) and didn’t leave my rotation for a quite a while after. I always preferred the louder, heavier end of post rock, so Glasgow Mega Snake became an instant favourite and is still probably my favourite track of theirs. Been quite a while since I listened to it actually, may give it a spin later.

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96: Emma-Jean Thackray – Yellow (2021)

I remember reading the description of this before listening to it and thinking “yep, this is exactly what I need”. And after listening, I knew it would be high on my end of year list. 2 years later and it’s still in regular rotation and probably one of the best jazz albums this country has released in the past 10 years. A stunning mix of jazz, funk and soul that never fails to bring a smile to my face and always makes me wanna have a dance.

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Had a work sports day on Friday and have spent the last three days in pain because, funnily enough, playing 5 games of football when you’ve had zero exercise in 6 years is not a good idea! So will hopefully do some more of this during the week.

However, I’m also off work this week too….

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Well, that went well.

Let’s get back to this…

Why didn’t I read this before I played a charity tournament last wed?! My ribs still hurt

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95. The Comet Is Coming – Trust In The Lifeforce Of The Deep Mystery (2019)

How about a bit more jazz, huh? 2019 was the year that jazz became more than just an occasional listen and this album, along with albums by Makaya McCraven, Theon Cross and Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah, was the start of the jazz obsession that still continues to this day. The mix of sax, synths and drums were unlike anything i’d heard before and to make it as fun and danceable as it is but still be interesting and complex was something that took me surprise. So glad I managed to catch them live before they went on indefinite hiatus, the tracks off this definitely stood out more than the others. Banger.

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94: Isaac Hayes – Hot Buttered Soul (1969)

Along with jazz clicking for me in 2019, 60s/70s soul also finally clicked with me too. Mostly down to finally getting Spotify a year earlier, it gave me the chance to listen to a lot of acts i’d always dismissed without giving a fair listen (The Beatles, Bowie, Stevie Wonder, a load of others). One of those was Isaac Hayes. I’d always dismissed him as just the guy that did Shaft and played Chef on South Park. But after going through a phase of watching a load of sample videos on Youtube, I noticed just how many of my favourite beats were made with his samples. So I started at the beginning (well, his second album, his first is normally ignored due to him not having creative control). This 4 tracks album is a sprawling masterpiece of psychedelic soul that is bookended by two of his best songs. His epic 12 minute cover of Walk On By by Burt Bacharach at the beginning and the mammoth near 19 minute version of By The Time I Get To Phoenix (made famous by Glen Campbell, who’s grammy winning version is under 3 minutes long!). This along with Black Moses are the two albums of his I revisit most and could easily be higher on the list if i’d started listening to it a couple of years earlier. A classic.

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it’s going to be top 20 at least on mine!

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Really intrigued as to what your 108th best lp is?

Probably something by Oneohtrix Point Never. Realised after I had started the thread that I hadn’t included anything of his. Would probably be Rifts. I know it’s a collection of older tracks, but it was my intro to him and has some of my favourite stuff he’s done.

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an excellent choice. Replica was the one that got me. I should really look into some of his more recent stuff!

I look forward to your list!

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93: De La Soul - 3 Feet High and Rising (1989)

Another album that should probably be higher if i’d spent more time with it over the years. But that is mostly down to it not being on streaming and my debilitating laziness. I have had it downloaded since they made all their albums available in that torrent over 10 years ago, but never gave it more than a listen maybe once every 3/4 years. I know, I know, shame on me.

This is actually an album that I had a bit of history with. I was in my last year or two at school and had a friend who would constantly sing The Magic Number. One day, he recorded the album onto cassette for me and I would listen to the first 4 or 5 songs before moving onto something else. I rarely listened to whole albums back then, so I had no idea of the joys I was missing. But it was around the time I was getting into nu-metal and pop punk, so it was just the case of bad timing. In a lot of ways, i’m glad I only really appreciated it in the past year or two as I have been able to pick out and notice all the samples that would have flown over my head as a dumb 16 year old kid.

But yeah Good album.

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92: Fugees - The Score (1996)

Maybe the first hip hop album I ever bought? I had bought a lot of singles and had people make copies of albums for me, but I think this is the first I bought with my own money. Initially, I hated Killing Me Softly because it was EVERYWHERE and 13 year old Paul didn’t like that. However, after Ready or Not came out and seeing the video to Fu-Gee-La a few time on The Box, I re-evaluated KMS and eventually grew to love it… although not as much as the Roberta Flack version. The album as a whole is fucking great and How Many Mics, Zealots and the title track are all bangers.

Lets not talk about the No Woman, No Cry cover, though…

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91: Comeback Kid - Turn It Around (2003)

Lets open up the pit! Comeback Kid are one of the few hardcore bands I can still go back to and enjoy no matter what. One of those albums where, if your feeling a bit shit, you can stick it on and shout out the lyrics and have a mini pit in your front room (for a minute before you collapse through exhaustion). It was between this and Wake The Dead (only two albums of theirs i’ve listened to tbf), but this sneaks in because like most of the albums on here, it’s the one that got me into them.

JUST LET IT GO.

Wow, I am so bad at this. Lets do some more…

90: Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and Max Roach - Money Jungle (1963)

Before Comet Is Coming made jazz become more than just an occasional listen, I had three albums that I would always go back to. Two of them are later on in this list, so wont spoil what’s to come, but this was the third. I don’t even know how I came across it. All three have much bigger and more well known albums, but this one was the one that caught my interest. Whilst Mingus and Roach were well versed in jazz at the time, Duke always seemed more of a traditionalist, so to hear him here battling with two of the best and keeping up with them makes this album a lot more interesting that any of his other work.

I am not at all good at talking about jazz, so i’ll just say that this is an album that should be on those 100 jazz albums to listen to before you die type lists (it may well be, but lets just say for this that it’s not) because it really is that good.

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89: Wolf Eyes - Burned Mind (2004)

I feel the explosion at the end of that gif is probably fairly accurate considering the music on this album. If I didn’t know what to say about that last album, I definitely don’t know how to talk about noise music. Whilst there is clearly noisier albums out there, to me, this is the pinnacle of noisy music. It’s constant barrage of feedback that still somehow sounds like actual music. Seriously, I don’t know how to describe this. How do music reviewers do it???

22nd August, huh? Time to get back to this, then…

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88: Makaya McCraven - Universal Beings (2018)

Another one of the albums that awakened the dormant jazz fan in me. I saw the review on p4k and the description immediately jumped out at me. He recorded with jazz artists from 4 major cities in the world (well, London and three US cities, but still) improvising and then took those recordings and created completely new songs out of them in a similar approach to what hip hop producers do? Um, yes please! Featuring some of jazz’s best (Including Shabaka, Jeff Parker, Nubya Garcia and Joel Ross to name just a few), this is easily one of the best jazz albums of the past 5/10 years and still gets regular listens from me.

It’s been a couple of months since I last listened to it actually… :thinking:

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87: Roy Ayers Ubiquity – Everybody Loves The Sunshine (1976)

Vibraphone players don’t tend to get as big as players of other instruments in jazz. However, there are a couple of exceptions and probably one of the best still going is Roy Ayers. Probably the best summer album on this list and one that pairs perfectly with sitting in the park with a picnic and a few drinks. The title track is obviously the most well known track on here, but opener Hey Uh What You Say Come On and The Third Eye are both just as good.

Still gutted he got covid just before X The Tracks, he was one of the acts I was looking forward to most that day. Was part of his farewell tour, so fingers crossed he does one more show in London before he’s done :crossed_fingers:

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