Going for an interview for a job you don't want


#1

Really stuffed things up. Put a speculative application in for a job I didn’t think I’d be shortlisted for at a time when I was quite unhappy in my current position. Two months later and things are much better at my work (including promotion and payrise) but now I’ve been shortlisted and have an interview tomorrow.

It’s a good position back in academia but significant pay cut, which I don’t think they can really do much about (still pay cut if they put me at the top of the academic band). If it wasn’t a pay cut I’d be really into it but the missus has just got a nice part time job and don’t want to start putting her under pressure to increase her hours. Will probably get the job now and have to work out how to turn it down without coming across like a complete prat. Also could do without the general interview faff and presentation stuff

urgh

any ideas/experience/similar tales/funny ways to throw an interview?


#2

#3

Hi

My circustances have now changed so I will no longer be taking part in the recruitment process.

Yours

J. Tosh (2001)


#4

if you have to do actual prep/presentation for it then just fuck it off mate


#5

Ok so I was planning to do this last week, but then they emailed me asking to confirm if I was attending the interview. So I couldn’t really say no because that would have just looked like I was just being lazy and was never going to reply. Now I just look DiSorganised.


#6

It doesn’t matter

We have had people just not turn up to interviews on the day

Reason: I found another job.

Just let them know - it’s fine


#7

I think out of politeness you have to prepare for it, show up, do your best, negotiate a fair salary, accept the position, sign the offer letter, then not show up for the first day and never return their calls ever again.


#8

A couple of months from application to interview seems quite a long time.

Take it seriously, for practice and to see how other places operate, if nothing else.

If they offer you the position, say that in the interim your family circumstances have changed and you feel that you would not be appropriate at this time, I guess?


#9

yeah that’s my current plan. the experience and insight will be helpful. the gap is strangely long but the interview date was indicated on the job advert so i’m not sure why there was the delay - maybe a senior staff member on study leave or something.


#10

Just call and say you are withdrawing your application.


#11

i say this all the time, no one ever gets it


#12

also that facial spasm thing kills me every time


#13

Whats the point?

You’re just wasting everyones time.


#14

Or if you really want some interview experience you can always turn it down if they offer it to you.

And as always with these things any questions you have about a job are moot until they actually offer you it anyway.


#15

yep, I think that’s where I’m coming from as well.


#16

Either treat it as a practice interview or take a wrap of speed and go full spud.


#17

Nightmare. Been offered the job, and my former colleague and close friend was on the panel (as an external expert). Completely fucked


#18

You’ve obviously got to take the new job to save any embarrassment then. Is there any chance you could work both jobs in some kind of permanent “Mrs Doubtfire at the restaurant” scenario?


#19

Ask for more money


#20

I did an interview for something I didn’t really want recently and wasn’t sure whether to go for it and thought it went badly but it was ok and now I get paid to go live in germany for 2 months :slight_smile:

you might decide you actually really want it idk