Greek alphabet

eggs

#1

Any of them nu to you?

Not even checking if this has been done before.


#2

IT’S ALL GREEK TO ME!!!

thunderbirds laughing.gif


#3

Can recite it from memory, obviously, because I’m a super cool person.


#4

Alpha Beta Charlie Delta Epsilon Foxtrot … Gamma!


#5

O’s the best of the bunch in my opinion. Omicron.

We should have letters called stuff like Omicron in our alphabet.


#6

Know most of it because of SCIENCE


#7

Double-u is pretty spectacular, to be fair. Although makes you wonder why m isn’t double-n.


#8

w comes after u
n comes after m

So if you got to m, and it was double-n you’d be bamboozled because you’d be like “what is an n?”


#9

Why do /s/ sounds get extra fancy letters?

yſc

lol This article uses bare URLs m8


#10

Same here. I think scientists are a bit lazy though, they never seem to make use of other alphabets though and end up giving multiple meanings to each greek letter.


#11

guy next to me in work just used the word bamboozled, I had to ask him if he was reading my posts. He said no one does.


#12

Fair


#13

I know these, and can actually read some bits of stuff in ancient Greek (not modern Greek) because…classics.


#14

Did Physics at university and was a keen Astronomer beforehand so I’ve probably encountered them all.


#15

n ought to be half-m then if you follow that logic


#16

most of them made an appearance in higher maths and physics I think


#17

i always preferred it in French as a) doo-bluh-vay sounds better imo and b) W is more like two Vs than two Us

also, i always liked in French how Y is pronounced egrek, looked it up today and turns out that it’s “i grec”, as in “Greek I”, which I’d never realised before. dunno if this is one for the slow to realise things thread though.


#18

I did a beginners’ Ancient Greek module on my uni semester in France because it was double the credits for the same contact time as other modules. Failed my speaking exam because I didn’t pronounce it all with a French accent.

Learned how to say stuff like “the horse is in the field” and “the farmer goes to the market” in a dead language though so all was not lost.