Guardian


#123

Part of me just feels that she should be free to experience her pregnancy however she likes. I wouldn’t do any of those things she does, and I wouldn’t suggest anyone follow her plan, but it’s her choice to make.


#124

And her child’s birth as well?

She got lucky. Very, very lucky, and disregarding the consequences for her child of her thinking that her luck is judgement are completely arrogant and reckless.


#125

“Our little girl, Fox”


#126

I think she has terrible judgement and arrogance. She did get lucky. But what can you do except condemn her actions? Do you think there should have been some intervention?


#127

Yeah, I do, for the safety of the child. She risked seriously endangering her baby. If I were doing things that seriously endanger my kid now I would expect some sort of intervention


#128

What about people who smoke or drink during pregnancy?


#129

If any parents endangered their child that much after birth, they’d definitely be looked at by social services.

Anyway, turns out it just an advert for her own counselling service:

http://www.laceyhaynes.com/1-on-1-pregnancy-support.html


#130

Would depend how much you were drinking and what you were smoking. If baby was born with foetal alcohol syndrome for example, then yeah.


#131

do people like this really exist?

white people are the worst.


#132


#133

What


#134

looking and dressing like a cartoon character has been in fashion for a while now


#135


#136

can’t believe Corbyn wants to FORCE us to go to the seaside 4 more times a year, even in November. he’s gone too far.


#137

Best thing I’ve ever read in my life. Some of my favourite lines:

I’m 32 and a yoga teacher, so yoga and mindfulness have allowed me to understand and trust my body.

At the beginning, I went to the GP but it wasn’t empowering.

(the midwife) told us all these scary things (if we didn’t get a scan): you could die; your baby could die…I cried in the street – why would she want to make me question my own body?

I chose never to use the word “pain” but “sensation”.

If we had the money, we might have hired a private midwife who could support us without being constrained by the system.


#138

Fucking hell. The article itself is worth a read because it’s horrible, nasty stuff.

I mean: “There’ll be one comedian in your life who thinks it would be a really normal and achievable idea to drive to a seaside town, forgetting that it was taken over by racists in the mid-2000s. And 1,000 hours later, there you’ll be, sullenly eavesdropping on a couple at a service station while you tend to a seasonal latte and wait for everybody to come back from the toilet. “You’ve just got to buy the bullet,” the woman says, with force. “Is that the phrase?” the man replies. “Yes, so you’re invested, and can’t back out.””

So everyone from a seaside town is racist and thick? What the fuck? How did the Guardian allow this to be published?

Obviously it’s supposed to be tongue in cheek but it’s all done in a sneery, condescending, anti-prole tone. Also completely unaware that a lot of Seaside towns have big issues with poverty, and seasonal stuff/bank holidays is a source of income desperately needed. If people get more days off (mint) and it puts some money into places that need it, what’s the fucking problem?

See also: “you do yearn now for the spa-like calm of work, where you are allowed to have a cup of tea whenever you fancy, and talk to adults about things like Isis without cheerily pretending everything is going to be OK”

Spa-ike? Tea whenever you fancy? Mature chat about political events? MAYBE YOUR WORK EXPERIENCES ARE MORE PRIVILEGED THAN OTHERS AND PEOPLE WHO HAVE IT HARDER WOULD LIKE MORE TIME OFF.

I’m raging about this like.


#139

until recently i had never ever experienced this kind of job.


#140

#141

by not printing any of it themselves?


#142

I’m on board with a smaller format—I’ve always hated the size of newspapers (berliners, let alone broadsheets) as it makes them a right pain to read anywhere other than sitting at a large table.