Have we done this yet? #2


#1

After we did this: Have we done this yet?, which was fun, I thought it’s time for another Billy Jizz property thread based on an informative but irritating BBC online article. This is the one we’ll be looking at today on co-living spaces.

Personally, I would not like to live in one of these arrangements, but would anyone be tempted?

Please delete if this has been done before. alright morrissey


#2

fuck no


#3

We have done it before but you should never let that stop you.


#4

I don’t live in London and this sounds hellish to me but I can see why it would be a tempting option for someone in a city which promotes/enforces a fucked up work life balance and has a completely broken housing market


#5

I would loathe this


#6

I can see the benefit in this definitely, but not at the prices they’re quoting.


#7

from about £1,000 to nearly £3,000 a month

stopped reading after this


#8

Its quite expensive as well, I would be tempted if it was a cheaper alternative but it is not


#9

There was a feature on the news about this about a year ago. Rogue landlords in London basically converting huge buildings to massive dorms with people sharing bathrooms and some communal space including bars, cafes, etc.

Think we worked out that one building alone would generate about £27m a year if full.


#10

they’d have to pay me to move back into halls!!


#11

Can’t stop laughing at between 1,000 to 3,000 a month :rofl:


#12

I would have preferred this to living on my own which I did when I got my first proper job and moved away from home.


#13

Yes, we probably taken for granted that most of us on here are a little further on in life and don’t want to ‘regress’ back to group living. At the same time, these aren’t really graduate or student prices, but then again, neither is regular housing.


#14

Basically just HMO’s aren’t they. Some landlord tried converting a 2 bed cottage into a 7 bed HMO for professionals on my road.


#15

I don’t really see how it’s that much different to living in a shared house with strangers which plenty of people do without it drawing endless think-pieces. If anything I see more benefits from the co-living space but it’s horses for courses.


#16

I still don’t get how this is differnet from living with flatmates or housemates?

possibly because I haven’t read the article


#17

In Soviet Russia, article reads you!


#18

and definitely nobody was lonely in student halls


#19

I think it is similar but on a much larger scale. You’ll still get people stealing your milk, but 100 potential culprits instead of 2.


#20

I guess it would be quite good for people who work somewhere in the week and then live somewhere else at the w/e or whatever. Although with WFH that probably doesn’t happen that often anymore and you wouldn’t want to pay £3k for the privilege .