Have you got a favourite author?


#1

Or maybe non-fiction writer, if that’s your bag. I think I’d have to go with Jon McGregor, even though he’s just got 4 novels (plus one anthology). I have absolutely no issue with constantly re-reading his stuff: he’s got this knack for being believably conversational at the same time as being memorably poetic.

Favourite authors DiS? I’ve good faith this’ll make a strong list


#2

I’ve a couple.

Pynchon
Lorrie Moore
Stephen King (fuck y’all :wink:)
Kafka
Vonnegut
Ellroy


#3

I want to say Orwell but I think the author I have everything by is Paul Auster so have to say him.

Auster

Followed by murakami and Orwell


#4

Gabriel Garcia Marquez


#5

DeLillo (probably)


#6

Magnus Mills, will read and enjoy everything he puts out. The Restraint of Beasts is one of my all time favourite books


#7

The author i go back to most is Orwell. Predictable answer i know, but find his work, especially his essays, extremely accesible and comforting and there’s something particularly simple about his writing style. Always find myself going back to Narrative Essays, and the Penguin Great Ideas handbooks, and have Down and Out in Paris and London and Homage to Catalonia pretty much on permanent loop.

For me his novels are a bit shit, even the famous ones, but as a diarist or non-fiction writer, he’s in the very least a great starting point. For me it never really led anywhere. I tried reading stuff by Arthur Koestler and W Somerset Maugham but they didn’t really appeal. The only book Orwell led me to that i really enjoyed was People of the Abyss by Jack London, which isn’t too disimilar from Down and Out…


#8

Iain (M) Banks


#9

Kafka
Murakami
Cormac McCarthy

There’s loads of cycling writers I enjoy reading but they’re not worth mentioning in here.


#10

hmm, big fan of Flann O’Brien, though he’s inconsistent, his later novels are still fairly interesting and amusing but much patchier and a bit more lightweight, meaning he’s only got a couple of really good books - those good ones are excellent though and include my favourite book. the short story collection that came out a couple of years ago is really good as well

otherwise another vote for Orwell. have enjoyed some of his novels but like @bugduv i find him far more interesting as a writer of non-fiction and essays, find his work in that field to be just really engaging.


#11

i thought Darkness At Noon was a really great novel but i haven’t read anything else he’s done.

from his wikipedia page he seems like a pretty questionable character


#12

Used to be be Iain (no M) Banks. Tend not to read much fiction nowadays.


#13

The author I’ve read the most is Philip K. Dick, so I’ll go with him! Still so much left to read!


#14

You won’t have heard of them.


#15

at the moment probs Jose Saramago or AM Homes
pretty into your man Philip Dick too


#16

VladNab


#17

Another vote for Kurt Vonnegut. Slaughterhouse 5, Cat’s Cradle and Mother Night could quite easily occupy my top 3 books ever written on some days. Probably the writer that best captured the lunacy of the human experience.

Feel like Philip K. Dick is another good shout, though I’ve only read two of his books so can’t definitively say yet. Those 2 works are monumental achievements though.

Glad to see Homage to Catalonia getting some love for Orwell. Always been my favourite book of his (though 1984 runs it close, natch)


#18

JG Ballard has been my number one author ever since I read his short stories as a teenager.

I’m currently enjoying re-reading all the short stories and novellas of Ted Chiang. He covers similar ground as Ballard, but not as prolific. Chiang’s entire output since 1991 would fill ~500 pages. He wrote Story of Your Life (aka the film Arrival).


#19

Terry Pratchett
Stephen King
Lee Child
Sue Townsend


#20

have you read any of the cycling anthology series? i’ve been quite enjoying those lately :slightly_smiling_face: