Have you quit Spotify?

Eh? You mean quit radio play altogether and just let people find them on streaming? How on earth would that help?

No, I mean just put singles on streaming and not albums. The radio was that for a lot of people (probably) streaming and playlists has replaced radio listening.

No offense but that’s a terrible idea

Why? It might encourage more sales.

It would need everyone to do it or it wouldn’t work. If the industry was capable of acting in that way it wouldn’t be in the state it was in.

It’s like if a band don’t put their music on Spotify. Do I go out of my way to listen to them, or do I just listen to one of the 482373947292 other bands in existence? I do the latter, obviously.

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I guess it depends on how much you want to hear a specific band/album but then I still buy loads of cds.

I buy stuff too. Lots of people here do. I don’t think that has much to do with it.

It’s just, it’s not like there are two albums released a week. The DIY ethos and home recording and digital distribution mean that music is easier and cheaper to make and release than ever. But the downside is that - even as someone who is pretty picky with the weekly new music threads - I still end up with 30-40 new releases each month saved, of which I’ll seriously listen to maybe 15.

It just means that most music - especially new music, from new artists - is pretty interchangeable at the end of the day, and that there’s always far more than I want to listen to and spend time with than I ever get to, and anyone deliberately opting out is doing themselves more harm than doing good for the wider sense.

I think it’s often very short-sighted when people raise ideas around how to re-access a pre-streaming past. It’s also an entirely separate conversation from quitting Spotify on ethical grounds as raised at the start of this thread.

For artists, quitting Spotify is an option only to the privileged. Even ideas mentioned in this thread like using Spotify as a marketing platform to sell physical records (by sharing singles, or iTunes-esque samples) just do not take into account music listening habits of the modern day. Unless an artist has real pull, people are not going to accept pay-walls in the way that they once did when it was materially necessary.

Buying physical releases is also a separate conversation as well. It doesn’t matter if you boycott file-based music in favour of purchased music on some set of arbitrary or puritanical grounds because anachronistic practices won’t resolve contemporary problems. It only ties into this issue insofar as in some cases it directs more money to artists. If that’s how you rationalise using Spotify, then okay. But it’s not a meaningful replacement to streaming, especially not as the rate of new music becomes increasingly saturated and globalised.

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The band America were from the UK?!

Sort of, they were all children of US military people stationed here

A somewhat darkly funny trend is people officially uploading sped up versions of their songs:

They do it because the songs have been hits on TikTok sped up.

I imagine third parties would also be more than happy to upload sped up versions and skim a bit of cash off the numbers

article about this trend here

Here’s a podcast from earlier this year where it first got brought to my attention.

Yeah that’s not Prince

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The desktop redesign is a war crime

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Why are they so determined to make it absolute dogshit! Leave it alone!

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What were they thinking!?

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Why is it so slow??

It is SO SLOW

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I’ve been trialling the new AI DJ function this evening. It seems to group songs into fours - you get a bit of AI generated chat, then four songs on a theme. Some of it has been pretty good. At the moment I’ve got a Les Rallizes Denudes track going that I’ve never heard before - sheets of guitar…

Had a good nostalgia run with Mulder and Scully followed by Girl From Mars, then Killing in the Name Of… don’t think I’ve ever listened to those myself, but Spotify clearly knows that I used to frequent indie clubs in the early 2000s.

Other times, it seems to want to promote popular (presumably paid for?) tracks… and people with dodgy backgrounds… Arcade Fire and Hookworms in one group of four.

Some interesting chat in this

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