Heatpumps

Talk to me, oh boring ones <3

Been advertised heatpumps are coming to our region.

Buy in is 5k but allegedly makes for much smaller bills (and is better for the environment but christ who cares about that).

Any pros or cons to this? Gimme some info if you know what you’re talking about…

Cons: singing “don’t you know pump it up, you’ve got to pump it up” every time you think about it

(sorry)

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Almost certainly the best answer this thread will see

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So, basically, right, they pump heat. Heat that otherwise wouldn’t be getting pumped. They take that wasted heat, right, and they pump it to places. Good places. The heat pumps.

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See?

We were thinking about one of these, but heard the following that put us off:

  1. They’re quite noisy and we live in terraced townhouse sort of thing, so there’s nowhere we could place one that wouldn’t be relatively close to a neighbour’s window.
  2. They don 't work once the temp goes below about 7/8C, which in the bleak north of England is going to be pretty regularly in winter.

You could add “apparently” to both of these as we’ve made little effort to properly look in to it. Would be interested to hear from anyone who knows what they’re talking about.

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You can get ground source (rather than air source) heat pumps which are quiet, more efficient and last longer but are more expensive and you have to dig a big hole.

(This is half remembered from researching them recently rather than me knowing what i’m talking about)

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Don’t you know pump it up

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Gonna be in my head for hours now

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important questions to consider

  1. who’s wanting pumped
  2. are you wanting pumped

move forward from there

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Yeah, I was think air source. Don’t think ground source would really be an option for us.

Apparently they cool as well as heat, which is a pro, but also an air con

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Todd Grimshaw stole one on Corrie the other month

Think this is just if they’re used to heat(/cool) air that is blown around your house like what they have in america rather than water in radiators which is more common here.

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Not read the replies and I suppose I could be misinformed

But I believe they take up a lot of room outside your house and are not that great at heating a whole house.

5k sounds quite a lot but depends how much cheaper bills will be.

I reckon 5k would pay my bills for a few years

But yes the environment is worth considering too

some links i’ve come across whilst researching

I used to think they wouldn’t work with water filled rads and that they needed a really well insulated house but apparently neither is true. Whether they work with water filled rads is dependent on the bore of the pipework.

How long you planning to be in your house?

I always understood that if they were to have any usefulness your house needs to be really well insulated, but maybe that’s changed.

I think all new builds are meant to have them going forwards so we’ll all have to learn about them at some point, presumably the tech will continue to get better though so not sure when the point will come when it’s worthwhile to make the switch.

What appeals to you about having one? In general, if you only want to save money there are probably better options, as the return on investment period is at least 10 years. If you want to do your bit for the planet and also potentially save a bit long term, they are great.

Ultimately we’ll all have them, or similar technology. I’m planning to get one installed as part of my house renovation. Can answer more detailed questions if you know what you want.

New to this burgling lark are we?

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