💿 How Good Is It Really 💿 Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)

Straight back in for a second listen, though, and Shame… is probably gonna be my final call.

Great samples for horns and keys on top of a swaggering beat and baseline. Method is tight and punchy. Rae keeps the energy levels high, which weaves the vocal track to the music track nicely, making it a full-fledged piece, rather than it just being ace rapping over a great beat.

Then there’s ODB. Ooooft. On top form here. And throughout the album. I think that, apart from the trademark RZA beats and the general crew/clan vibe, ODB is the totally unique and identifiable element that rises above. His delivery is just incredible. Totally peerless.

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Starting to think I should’ve chosen Protect Your Neck…

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By the way, it’s a 10
Cos there’s just no filler
Introducin’ the Ghostface Killaaaaaaaaaaa-aaa-aaa-aaa-aaah
No one could get iller

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Can’t wait to get up tomorrow and listen to this.

ODB’s section in …Chessboxin’ is just outrageously good and quite rightly everyone else lets him go off, taking the lion’s share of lines. He’s that wildcard element that brings everything together. That barking sing-song flow; the man barely needs a track behind him.

As for the album as a whole, it’s not my favourite of all time (and I probably rate Liquid Swords and Supreme Clientele over it in the Wu-Tangverse) but it’s still an indisputable 10/10 for me. The production is rough, the beats are rougher and yet it’s so utterly iconic despite that; the moment those snaps/woodblock clacks come in on Bring Da Ruckus I am instantly hyped for what’s to come.

Like most hip hop, it’s not normally something I listen to at my computer but times being what they are I’m having to get used to it. Feels weird listening to it static but I’ve enjoyed hearing it in the dead of night, the only other noise a little desk fan. Really keys you into how the whole thing is patched together with little more than sheer will and bravura.

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9.49 for Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers). We have a new leader!

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Blimey

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When I looked earlier in the week it was 9.6

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Late flurry of interpol fans

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Do think the Interpol comparison/ whatever is a valid one. Reckon that most users on here would have an opinion about Interpol, either positively or negatively and be happy to come in the thread to express but I reckon with a thread like this those people for whom hip hop in general or wtc specifically isn’t their cup of tea just wouldn’t come into the thread at all and therefore you’re only left with the positive opinions. Could be wrong but that’s very much my impression.

Holy crap, was not expecting that!

I was going to say it was my fault for saying it’s ok to give it a 1 but yours is funnier

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Turn on the Bright Lights and 36 Chambers are both 10s :man_shrugging:

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But, more pertinent to your point, there’s no arguing that 36 Chambers isn’t a way more important album for it’s time and genre, a complete standout, whereas TOTBL hit some people really hard and to others it’s in a sea of various releases just like it at the time (much as it pains me to say it).

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I ordered the CD for like £2:70. Not heard it for an age. I had the vinyl that I bought circa 1995 so not the 1st press but don’t want to know how much that may be worth now. It would have been an import and I’ve lost it over the years.

A worthy leader and a very unique album. Strange combination of it sounding grubby yet light years ahead of the likes of Public Enemy who were fading pretty fast back then

I think that’s a fair comment but 9.49 is still a hell of a score. I didn’t vote in the end because I didn’t give it as many listens as a wanted but from what I did hear I prefer Illmatic. And I know this is going to be an unpopular opinion, I really don’t like ODB

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I think ODB is who makes them as special as they were. The first time I saw / heard him on Yo MTV Raps in the very early 90’s he was skitting between Sinatra style crooning and the very rawest of rap delivery. When interviewed he came across like he’d almost lost the plot but there was always a spark of genius in what he came out with, like he was in touch but just on a different level to most.

I remember in his later days the news story of him running out of a sports shop with stolen Nike trainers on and just thinking, why not pay. He could wander into Pop incredibly easily and should have been a bigger star than he actually was. Incredible talent and you never knew exactly where he was coming from or where he would go. Big loss to music.

Huge demons. Huge talent

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Yeah same here. Although I liked it more than Illmatic I think even if I like NY State of Mind more than 36 Chambers

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Totally this. 36 Chambers was a game changer. Influenced things far beyond the music. We forget that the original Protect Ya Neck single was self released. Always felt like it sparked that mid 90s independent scene in New York that I can trace so many of my favourite artists back to.

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