How long have you been in your current job?


#41

This is the main reason I want to retire at the earliest opportunity, and why I’ll be using up all of one of my pensions filling the gap to the state retirement age. Want to make sure I don’t let those bastards have off with my money over my corpse.


#42

To be fair, four figures (if it’s in pounds and you’re not in your fifties) into a pension is mental.


#43

ikr

literally no idea where she gets all her money from, she’s always doing stuff to her house and going on long-haul holidays and buying stuff, dunno how she has that much left over at the end of each month. like… after rent and groceries and bills and stuff i definitely do not have £1000 to spend on extras, let alone save.


#44

Sounds like one of these people in Guardian articles.


#45

As I understand it the advice if you have money left over is to pay your debts off first and then save. I guess if you have a grand a month to save then a pension’s not a terrible place to put it, but you don’t need to.

Did a little Google, came up with this. Looks like £400 a month would make most people pretty comfy.


#46

lol.

also kinda pissed (but not really tbh) that she said she couldn’t afford to come over here to visit, and then fucked off to mexico

anyway i am derailing the thread


#47

6 months.

Never stayed in a job for longer than 22 months


#48

On the first question, one clue came from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) this week, which said the average retired household now spends £21,770 a year.

That £21,770 figure comes with a big caveat: a much higher percentage of people who are currently retired are living mortgage-free and rent-free than will likely be the case for younger generations when they hit retirement age.

None of those calculators seem to factor in that you might be paying £15K a year per couple in rent for a flat after you finish working.


#49

Yep absolutely. Posted for info only.


#50

I change career like once a year though

At the moment I’m thinking of becoming a historian


#51

That said of course, if you can save a grand a month in your twenties then you can probably get a mortgage paid off by retirement.


#52

Came here for a 3 month contract. In August 2013. Can get boring from time to time but they pay me too much and put up with too much of my shit to give me any reason to look elsewhere.


#53

3 years and a week, the last 2 years, 11 months and 2 weeks as a contractor, before finally turning permanent staff last month.

Now have an official parliament lanyard and everything, which I believe entitles me to swagger about the building like cock of the walk and an endless supply of cocaine, floosies and chunky Kit Kats.


#54

I have a part time job that I’ve had for nearly three years. All my other work is freelance but I’ve been writing regularly for one magazine for two years.

There are a couple of places where I worked for several years, but while I was a student etc so in various positions and temporary contracts etc.


#55

So then - I’ve been at my current employers for sixteen years, and been in my current role for nearly half that, getting promoted about two years ago.

I’ve only worked for one other company and I was there for over seven years - I thought that was a long time when I left!


#56

I started working where I am in August 2007, so 11 and a bit years. although that’s only been on a permanent basis since April 2011, which is only 7 and a half years. either way it’s a long time. probably too long tbh.

longest I’ve been in any other job was 6 weeks so current job is by far the longest I’ve been somewhere.


#57

there are people at my company who have been working here since the 60s, so that’s at least 50 years. baffling tbh.


#58

wtf how old are they?


#59

dunno didn’t say, but if they joined when they came out of school then late 60s?


#60

About 3 months. Longest was 4 years. Absolute waste of time.