Hypothetical question about the social benefits of work


#1

If you had the option of not having to work but you get to keep your wage on the condition you have to stay indoors from 9-5 every weekday and not leave the house. would you take it?
(you can do what the hell you like during that time as long as you’re at home)


#2

i can barely make it out the door anyway so to be paid for my social anxiety would be a fine thing, a fine thing indeed.


#3

Yes i would do that


#4

Can I leave on a lunch break?


#5

Happily.

It’s all I do on my days off anyway…


#6
  • Yes
  • No
  • Dunno, maybe

0 voters


#7

Absolutely fucking yes


#8

Can we do other stuff at home that could potentially earn us some money - like promoting gigs or doing a record label, for instance?

I have to say, despite liking the idea of not having to go out to work - it’s the travelling there and back, with other people on the same bus or train that I don’t like, rather than the work itself or my colleagues - if I was at home all day with nothing to do I would spend all my money on Discogs/eBay buying records. I’d very likely pour myself a G&T as soon as the clock strikes noon as well.


#9

Exactly this. If I could do something productive with my time instead then I’m okay with this.


#10

I say ‘potentially earn us some money’ because if I had enough money to live on I would organise gigs and do a record label for music I like simply because it’d be something I’d love to do, to support the music I love because I want to see this stuff continue and thrive. The making money out of it would be a bonus, though a welcome one. If I won the £100m plus on the Euro Lottery, that is pretty much what I would do, I reckon. Just do lots of cool shit (as well as having an awesome record collection and some sweet ass holidays).


#11

Sleep during the day and get a job at night. Therefore 2 wages.


#12

can i do flexitime


#13

your question kinda assumes people are happy with their current wages


#14

I don’t think you get these sorts of threads, the hypothetical is supposed to have some kind of downside.


#15

the op hasn’t really given enough information to go on.

@paintedpeople for lots of people it would depend on whether the arrangement was to last for life, whether they also get other benefits like pension contributions, whether the rest of society would have the same option or would have to carry on working. boils down to many of the same arguments and problems with UBI - lots of people would continue to make money far in excess of whatever the minimum was set at, whilst lots of other people would either develop no new skills to ever re-enter the labour market, carry out the unpaid work required by the crisis of care in late capitalism, be responsible for their own personal/professional development and effectively have to become even more entrepreneurial, have absolutely nothing to bargain with employers with (no labour) and be unable to transform their own situation. both potentially very neoliberal blueprints for reconfiguring the world of work…


#16

you may also be interested in this research

^one of many reasons why talking about ‘the social benefits of work’ is meaningless and ridiculous


#17

i could happily stay at home all day tbh, i find work insanely stressful. not cos of the tasks but because of the amount of social interaction. i find it very difficult to get to know other people and make friends, so i prefer to keep people at a comfortable distance where i can shoot the breeze with them in a friendly way, maybe cheer them up a bit if they’re having a bad time, but i never, ever get close enough to have to deal with their bullshit when they start stressing about the job, or whatever. sometimes it’s a bit lonely but mostly not.

then there are so many birthday drinks and staff nights out to avoid. it always gets harder to find an excuse after the first 18 months or so.


#18

Without wanting to come across as a bit of a shop steward, i probably wouldn’t, purely because i’ve spent periods of time out of work and i found it really depressing. You can get out of the habit of engaging with people, and even any social life outside of work will suffer. I have to get out of bed in the morning, or i’ll lie there all day, and as ridiculous as it sounds, i don’t enjoy that all that much a lot of the time.

I’d absolutely swap, say, half of my working week for staying in bed, but stopping in bed every day would only result in me smelling of arse and jizz, and boozing pretty much non stop.


#19

yes but I’d not be able to do it for longer than three months

Earlier this year I resigned from my job without a new one to go to, then spent three months with no job, living on the redundancy money I got last year. I did loads of music stuff and it was great fun but once I got a job again (which was only part time) I realised that having a job that got me out of the house was essential.

I left that position for a job that is full time but more money, better hours and not horrendously repetitive. Working part time is absolutely my goal if it pays enough though


#20

Ugh, no. I love my job and hate sitting at home.