I'm not even IN the bubblebook

makeuthink
facebook
:thinking:

#1

hmm, interesting :thinking:


#2

Don’t think any of this is a massive leap from the echo chambers people would’ve experienced in their respective communities 40 years ago or whatever.


#3

Yeah I think that’s probably true, that said the effect is multiplied to the nth degree - the more voices you have agreeing with you the more ‘right’ you will feel?


#4

Yeah for sure, and it seems people’s political views are also starting to tie in to people’s social capital (at least for their digital personas) in a weird way which probably isn’t healthy. Either way it clearly makes more polarised opinions if nothing else.


#5

We;re all doomed


#6

i have like 4 facebook friends who ever post political stuff


#7

I get the full spectrum in my FB newsfeed.


#8

Andrew W.K.
13 November at 21:25 ·
Hating people who hate people means you hate yourself.

#PartyHeart #StayStrong


#9

(badmouthing fascists is sad and wrong and not PARTY)


#10

Nazi mates? Interesting


#11

:frowning2: :


#12

I have 237 friends on facebook


#13

All balanced out by the Communists.


#14

speaking of facebook, what’s all this shit about zuckerberg and fake news? I keep seeing headlines but can’t be bothered to read any of the articles


#15

Facebook is worried about being seen as biased against conservatives, lead to them just leaving all things up and allowing not true stories in to their ‘trending news’ section.

From: http://www.vox.com/new-money/2016/11/16/13637310/facebook-fake-news-explained:

News stories are supposed to help ordinary voters understand the world around them. But in the 2016 election, news stories online too often had the opposite effect. Stories rocketed around the internet that were misleading, sloppily reported, or in some cases totally made up.

Over the course of 2016, Facebook users learned that the pope endorsed Donald Trump (he didn’t), that a Democratic operative was murdered after agreeing to testify against Hillary Clinton (it never happened), that Bill Clinton raped a 13-year-old girl (a total fabrication), and many other totally bogus “news” stories. Stories like this thrive on Facebook because Facebook’s algorithm prioritizes “engagement” — and a reliable way to get readers to engage is by making up outrageous nonsense about politicians they don’t like.

Since last week’s election, there has been a fierce debate about whether the flood of fake news — much of it prejudicial to Hillary Clinton — could have swung the election to Donald Trump. Internet giants are coming under increasing pressure to do something about the problem.

On Monday, Google announced that it was going to cut fake news sites off from access to its vast advertising network, depriving them of a key revenue source. Facebook quickly followed suit with its own ad network.

At the same time, CEO Mark Zuckerberg has signaled reluctance to have Facebook become more active in weeding out fake news stories. He described it as “a pretty crazy idea” to think fake news on Facebook could have swayed the election. He says Facebook will look for new ways to stop the spread of fake news, but he also argues that “we must proceed very carefully” and that Facebook must be “extremely cautious about becoming arbiters of truth ourselves.”

some Facebook employees are frustrated by Zuckerberg’s blasé response to concerns about fake news on the social media platform.

“What’s crazy is for him to come out and dismiss it like that,” one anonymous engineer wrote, according to BuzzFeed. “He knows, and those of us at the company know, that fake news ran wild on our platform during the entire campaign season.”


#16

hmm this is actually more interesting than I gave it credit for


#17

didnt fb accidentally report that zuckerberg died last wk? and then oh what a surprise, news is fake. bullshit. zuck is ded


#18

facebook, more like