INTERNET OF THINGS thread (rolling)

Lots of shite examples in here:

https://twitter.com/internetofshit

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I’m a big fan of stats, but even I’ll draw the line at how many times I open the fridge each day.

Without wanting to get all tinfoil hat, it seems a bit off that these sorts of activities should be tracked, logged and presumably used for something.

@ericthefourth @BodyInTheThames

OH shit, you mean I can share it on Social Media when I make a piece of toast? Fuck it, I’m in!

Imagine getting excited about some inanimate internet presence congratulating you on having achieved something arbitrary a certain number of times!

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None of it sounds very useful to me. You get ovens that connect via WiFi now and, again, I don’t really know what you get that’s useful from that.

I think it’s just a natural and appropriate development that some day Vladimir Putin will be able to take out the UK power network simply by simulating the nation’s biggest ever Coronation St ad break, setting off every kettle in the country. What could be more British than that?

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Exactly. I can see very, very little benefit to the consumer for most of this stuff, but it must be benefitting someone or they wouldn’t be selling it…

Data is useful for marketing, and marketing is more important than having a well-designed product.

Sure, although I don’t think

wireless NAS (home network only)

really counts as what we’re talking about, though? :smiley:

Remember when Corbyn did that tweet about the Internet of Things and nobody realised that ‘Internet of Things’ was a legitimate phrase and just thought he was writing his tweet half asleep and didn’t have a clue what he was on about

Yeah and we’re gonna invest in an internet of things and shit like that

How good are smart TVs these days at streaming via wifi?

When we did up our place, they were still pretty ropey, so we hard-wired in sockets alongside the TV/FM points.

We went for this alarm - it doesn’t need to be ‘Smart’, just with a phone connection: http://www.yale.co.uk/en/yale/couk/productsdb/alarms/-ef-series-alarms--accessories/Telecommunicating-Alarm-Kit/

Really easy to fit and get additional accessories for, too.

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Ability to pre-heat while sat on the bus home

Out of interest, did you consider Homeplugs instead of the hardwiring in network cables?

that’s proper done me.

It’s all surface fixed and wireless too, so there is no chasing out needed and it can be retro-fitted.

They do smartphone alarms as well, but we were worried about the lack of guarantee for the continued support of the apps needed to work them:

http://www.yale.co.uk/en/yale/couk/productsdb/alarms/smart-home-range-/

If our one goes off I get an automated phone call. The one we went for is not a monitored alarm, and doesn’t call through to the police, but the former will have a charge, and neither will guarantee that the police will actually come out anyway, so we went for the one we did.

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one thing about this CIA leak makes me think that the increasing usage of the devices has yet to be matched by a similar efforts to secure the protocols they use.

My TV is reet good at streaming on wifi. I’m 3 floors above the router and it streams 4K content fine.

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But then you think a burrito has to have meat in so can we trust anything you say?

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We did, but everything I read suggested that hard-wiring was the better option, especially if you were stripping everything back and re-wiring your house at the same time and were wanting to cater for the possibility of FTTP/cable TV.

It added a couple of hundred pounds to the overall job to have 7 sockets put in throughout the house and back to a patch panel.

Anyone read about the journalist who was killed by the CIA hacking into his car? Even though it’s probably not true it’s something that could happen. Imagine if ISIS or some other slags took control of loads of cars :scream:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Hastings_(journalist)#Controversy_over_alleged_foul_play