Is there anyone left to reform who might realistically get back together?


#81

Wasn’t he Brave Captain? What happened to that endeavour?


#82

Interview with Tim Brown the bassist: “I spoke to Sice recently who is enjoying his new career in psychology. We talked a bit about reforming – I’d be up for it, if we could do it electronically.”

Unfortunately that’s an interview from 7 years ago but with Martin and those two seemingly not out of the running there’s hope they could all be persuaded.

On the other hand, it sounds like Sice has become a very successful psychologist - could he take a sabbatical year from it? Hmm.

Slowdive are having way more success than they ever had back in the day. I’d like to think the Boos could do the same if they persisted and bookers etc put their faith in them.


#83

Seems like the sort of thing that could happen if ATP was still a thing and they asked someone like Gruff Rhys to curate.


#84

If only a new ATP could spring up with the same ethos.

If they could generate a bit of hype in advance, Boo Radleys would make a top headliner for End of the Road one year and offer something different from the usual names.


#85

I might be wrong here, but I feel that Festival No. 6 announcing The The as a headliner months before any other act is a good parallel here.


#86

Yes!!


#87

the white stripes?


#88

Nice to see the love for The Boo Radleys. Talking of “bands associated with a movement that were way better than that”, I’d love to see Supergrass again. They nearly did a one-off reformation at Glastonbury but Gaz apparently said no after too many people started talking about money and logistics… he just wanted it to be fun.


#89

Think I read something from Martin maybe a couple of years ago where he said he’d met up with Sice where they’d talked enthusiastically about reforming and that he’d got an album full of songs ready to go but Sice wasn’t actually up for it.

Boo’s I reckon are a case of a band who could have just kept going and got past the one hit wonder curse to end up being a successful and acclaimed band, or just taken a short break before putting out new material.


#90

Completely agree. Boos have got a stellar back catalogue and I’d be very happy with them just setting aside six months to a year to relive their youth, bash out the classics, earn some decent money and then go back to their lives.

Supergrass will reform one day for sure. Blimey, if they do an album-played-in-full for I Should Coco or In It For The Money it would be an electric night.


#91

Would love Wu Lyf to reform, never really got a chance to see them first time round,


#92

The River Empires
The Receiving End of Sirens
Silverchair
Necrophagist
Apes & Androids
Burst (just did a reunion live)
Fair to Midland
Kiss Kiss
Liquid Tension Experiment
Pure Reason Revolution


#93

In advance of the new album, Jason says he “doesn’t see the point” in a Spacemen 3 reunion:

He’s acknowledged before that he could use the money from a Spacemen 3 reunion (he’s apparently rejected several £million+ offers) but never bitten. Maybe he really means it. As much as I’d love to see Spacemen 3, I admire his tenacity and deep down, I hope he never caves in.


#94

I mean that Fugazi thing I attended did make it clear how hard it was for them to get back together due to the commitment involved.

For 10 years I only wanted to be in bands and my spare time was spent rehearsing and watching bands and wishing I was playing up there.

But when my last band ended I found I could just r joy music but had zero motivation to be on stage and involved with all the hard work involved in a performance. Dunno, I can imagine that happening to Sice.


#95

Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers

don’t care who he puts in the lineup - just get a band going again and rock out!


#96

I think that playing I Should Coco in full was the plan for the Glastonbury set that never happened.