Knot

Know knots?

Talk about them.

I know my way around a shoelace pretty well, am a very confident knotter of shoelaces I’d say.

Sometimes a knot can look like a figure of eight or something?

I do not know knot.

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Used to know a few from me ol’ angling days. Reckon I can do a half and possibly even full blood knot if forced.

Shoelaces, standard climbing figure 8 thing and nothing else. I don’t know any other knots.

Do you like the punchline: “I’m a frayed knot”, Tilty?

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knot is a stupid name for a boat’s speed, the marine conservation society need to sort that shit out

Feel like my Dad taught me a few fishing knots in my younger days.

How many hands high is your boat?

I love it. Worthy of inclusion in a great rom com such as Knotting Hill.

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  • “I’m a frayed knot”
  • A different punchline

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What an evocative post

In before @Twinkletoes beats me in to tying a double figure of eight knot.

I know loads tbh. Sheep shank, bowline, reef, clove hitch, highway man’s hitch, fireman’s knot, knots for lashing bits of wood together. #scouts

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That’s a stupid equestrian

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Thank you Balonz. It’s nice to be appreciated for once.

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until the mid-19th century, vessel speed at sea was measured using a chip log. This consisted of a wooden panel, attached by line to a reel, and weighted on one edge to float perpendicularly to the water surface and thus present substantial resistance to the water moving around it. The chip log was cast over the stern of the moving vessel and the line allowed to pay out. Knots placed at a distance of 47 feet 3 inches (14.4018 m) from each other, passed through a sailor’s fingers, while another sailor used a 30-second sand-glass (28-second sand-glass is the currently accepted timing) to time the operation. The knot count would be reported and used in the sailing master’s dead reckoning and navigation. This method gives a value for the knot of 20.25 in/s, or 1.85166 km/h. The difference from the modern definition is less than 0.02%.

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I actually know this, though I’m a little fuzzy with the details. I think that until the mid-19th century, vessel speed at sea was measured using a chip log. This consisted of a wooden panel, attached by line to a reel, and weighted on one edge to float perpendicularly to the water surface and thus present substantial resistance to the water moving around it. The chip log was cast over the stern of the moving vessel and the line allowed to pay out. Knots placed at a distance of 47 feet 3 inches (14.4018 m) from each other, passed through a sailor’s fingers, while another sailor used a 30-second sand-glass (28-second sand-glass is the currently accepted timing) to time the operation. The knot count would be reported and used in the sailing master’s dead reckoning and navigation. This method gives a value for the knot of 20.25 in/s, or 1.85166 km/h. The difference from the modern definition is less than 0.02%.

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Happy Knot!!!

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That’s what I said!