Learning a new language


#1

I want to learn Spanish, who’s learnt a new language recently? What’s the best way to do it?


#2

move to the country for a year at least or surround yourself with native speakers at home.


#3

Duolingo seemed a pretty decent way to try get a bit done every day, I was brushing up my Dutch


#4

I don’t know anyone who this has worked for tbh. I’ve always had the impression that its good to get started with the basics of a language, but if you actually want to get close to intermediate proficiency, you really have to speak with natives.


#5

Was pretty much my plan, had a job lined-up in Leuven which fell through :joy:


#6

?


#7

Duolingo is great for drilling in basics, but once you start getting into longer sentences which can have multiple ways of saying something/use idioms it turns into a bit of a mess. The lessons aren’t written by teachers, they’re created by machine learning in a similar way to Google translate, and slowly improved by the player’s feedback. So especially if you’re playing a level that not many other people have done, it gets very frustrating because it just won’t accept things you know are right or tries to teach you things that no native speaker of that language would ever say.

I used to have certain days of the month at an old job where everything on a project would be finished, all the is dotted and ts crossed and I’d literally be sitting there waiting for one last thing to come in so it could be signed off. I played right to the end on German and French on Duolingo and was really disappointed by the higher levels. I thought they’d have loads of practice for the tricky grammar things, but they didn’t cover them much, and the higher levels were a bit of a mess really.

So Duolingo’s great for drumming the basic vocab into your head, but don’t expect it to give you a good idea of how the language works or how people really speak it.


#8

yeah it’s good for basic stuff but really really not a good way to learn a language properly


#9

Going to an open evening at leeds beckett for a part time course tomorrow night


#10

Formal study is good, but you need to top it up with other elements for the language to really stick in my experience.

Best thing I’ve found is joining a language group so you can practice informally with people of a similar level. Meetups.com should have a group near you.

Aside from that, watching Spanish films with the Spanish subtitles on is good, as is reading Spanish news/websites.


#11

That’s the plan, get some basics and rewatch narcos and loads of Spanish films.
Got a local tapas bar that’s owned by a Spanish family, will relentlessly badger them to talk to me in Spanish until they bar me