Manchester by the sea


#1

have we had a thread on this yet?

saw it at the weekend, thought it was fucking excellent, dark as fuck but still a few unexpected laughs at points

only slight criticism being i’d have had more of the relationship between him and his ex-wife


#2

Geographically inaccurate


#3

going to see it tonight so will report back tomorrow


#4

Staines upon Thames.


#5

Its being talked about in the film thread but yeah it is outstanding - it is a pity there isn’t more Michelle Williams but the scene where they bump into each other after she has had her baby - goddamn.


#6

should that be marked as spoilers? dunno

but aye, christ…


#7

yeah, that scene could have been even better had we had a bit more of Randi’s character


#8

also lol at the kid’s band when he has Bridge Nine and Polar Bear Club posters in his room


#9

they’re no sex bob-omb


#10

Reporting back to say I really enjoyed this film. Bleak but also funny. Spoiler: During the final shot of them fishing on the back of the boat I was thinking ‘don’t end it there, I need more of a resolution / happy ending!’ and then it ended and it was brutal.


#11

C& P from the film thread, please go and see this film people:

Manchester by the Sea however is absolutely incredible, borderline masterpiece IMO. One of the most humane mainstream films I’ve ever seen.

It’s cliched to say a film makes you feel the full range of emotions but this really did, it’s funny as fuck which I wasn’t expecting at all (the family bickering in the hospital had me in stitches) but there are at least 5 points where it pulls the rug straight out from under you and punches you right in the gut. I cried about 6 times I think and burning house scene aside it was as a result of the nuances of the performances rather than through any big narrative moments. Every single performance was laced with so much humanity, you could read all the past turmoils and heartbreaks on their faces without them ever needing to be directly referenced in the dialogue. Michelle Williams is so fucking good, the kid was great, CJ Wilson was amazing but Casey Affleck should win every award going this year IMO, had absolutely no idea he had that in him.

It was beautiful to look at in a really understated way, the only very slight misstep was the choral score IMO but that didn’t matter much when the rest of it was so superb. I really hope lots of people go and see this and it doesn’t suffer from it’s opening weekend competition.


#12

pretty much agree with all of this, especially the bit about it giving you the full range of emotions and the score

would’ve preferred a super minimalist piano score done by olafur arnald or someone like that


#13

I actually thought the scenes without any score at all worked the best, it almost felt sometimes as if the score was added to make the scenes less gruelling when they are so often used to amp up the emotion.


#14

It’s a beautiful film with wonderful performances and, at times, almost unbearable emotional depth. But as stated elsewhere this is laughter too.

If you’re feeling fragile it might not be the movie for you right now.


#15

also c&p’d


#16

I didn’t realise how much I liked this until it finished. It’s an ebb and flow sort of film, very episodic and very reliant on the things that go unsaid. It’s particularly un-Hollywood in its approach to grief in that it doesn’t show it as something that stops people in their tracks, more as something that just makes life a lot harder for a while and never really gets resolved. I didn’t really notice any of the performances which is probably a compliment (although Casey Affleck veered dangerously close to Simple Jack territory a couple of times), and the orchestral score was mostly fine albeit slightly intrusive in places. Overall this was a really pleasant surprise considering what an overwrought heap of self-important bilge Margaret was. It’s exactly the kind of film the Oscars don’t touch with a barge pole but it’s refreshing to see a studio put so much faith in what’s actually a fairly unconventional film.


#17

madchester by the e


#18

“I’m in the hockey team, the basketball team, I have two girlfriends and I’m in a band”

That was a quote from the film, not a @disquote


#19

I know quite a few people who’ve gone to see this assuming it was set in or about Manchester, England. Silly twats.


#20

finally watched this. @Severed799 made a good point with the Ken Loach comparison; I mean, people don’t really articulate thoughts and emotions in anything close to the neatly scripted lines you normally get in books or films, but I also felt the way the feelings went largely unspoken captured that male or northern stilted stoicism that you might expect from Loach’s films.

[spoiler]the way life just carried on, too, very of that kind of film - when Patrick’s phone goes on vibrate at the service is a great example of the kind of humour that persists even in the wake of tragedy, that you don’t laugh at per se, but it persists just like anything.

the weight of the central tragedy carries through so subtly this way, an added resistance even as the characters keep on with everything, especially with Lee’s emptiness and guilt. there are times when it isn’t directly referred to, but you still remember it’s there. even the times when it actually comes to the surface are so subtly done.

the scene in itself is just devastating. you spend the time up to that point wondering what it was he did, with no foreshadowing at all of such a tragedy.[/spoiler]

I’m sure most people will have seen it by now, but spoilered my thoughts anyway.