NME - a true decline


#1

remember when it provided relevant info on new music. Look at it now. Shocking.


#2

This is a bit #hottake but yeah you’re right of course. Used to love it in the mid-90s.


#3

It’s very sad. Hard perhaps for younger people to understand just how important it was for me when I was getting into music (pre Internet, pre digital radio) - I discovered so much from the NME.

It’s been in a downward spiral since the late 90s and someone needs to put it out of its misery.


#4

Going free has been a gamble that hasn’t paid off.

I can’t even get it in Blackburn (population 100,000+!)

They even seem to be ending pick up points in London now, i.e. Clapham Junction ASDA.


#5

Is that not the advert on the front and the real cover is the next page? Remember picking some up last year and it often had a mock up cover as an overlay.

Either way, I guess the point still stands - and it is in a state. What choice did they have, I suppose.


#6

It is, to be fair an advert, but the content isn’t up to much at all is it. It is not the music paper it famously was. It’s a brand and nothing more. They could have taken it down to respectable, honest. real and relevant fanzine level and kept at least something.


#7

NME used to be quite alright to read, championed a lot of shit but it was suprisingly entertaining considering it was weekly. Picked a free one up and it was just awful. It had a three page spread dissecting Peep Show


#8

They could have used the brand and concentrated on making a really excellent website - a British alternative to Pitchfork. The website is woeful too and the brand has no value any more.


#9

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#10

It’s no Melody Maker.


#11

It’s no “Sounds” either which was always a bit heavier music wise and easier to read through the in jokes and journalistic style the pulpy NME had. It was a music broadsheet by the clued up for the clued up. As a music paper it was the front runner in the U.K. and so respected that it’s just plain crazy that it has stooped so low now.


#12

Great band


#13

even when i read old bits of it from the 80s when they were writing about great bands, the writing is horrific and cringeworthy and nonsensical. i guess you had to be there?


#14

fantastic, you have crashed my mobile phone.

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anyhoo, this thread reminded me that i picked up a copy the other week. i would share a photograph of the cover but of course it is on my mobile phone isn’t it :upside_down:


#15

Weird, it’s a Vimeo link and works fine on my cellphone


#16

seems fine now. maybe it only works when my head is in the toilet?


#17

just looked at the website and saw this. it’s almost too meta


#18

It was the go to paper for music news/reviews back in the day and pre-internet. Music recommendations were often just word of mouth in the school playground or the sixty form common room for me. This is probably a thread for oldies. Pocket money was spent on albums recommended by The NME and for me Channel Four’s Planet Sound (brilliant contributors). It’s countless the number of bands I got into by reading about them or reviews from The NME. Steven Wells will be spinning in his grave with what it’s now become. The NME Astoria gigs were brilliant too. I still remember seeing The Trail Of Dead on a Friday and At The Drive-In on the Saturday (or maybe the other way round, either way damn memorable). The NME just needs to accept that it got its model wrong in the internet age and just fold.


#19

boke


#20

Planet Sound :heart: