Obesity / Sofie Hagen / Cancer Research UK

Bit of a Twitter storm going on re: the above.

I’m obviously against fat shaming and we’ve had a lengthy thread on it in the past, but surely Hagen doesn’t have a leg to stand on here, scientifically? Happy to be convinced otherwise.

As a chubster I’m on cancer researches side.

It’s like saying smoking being a proven cause is offensive to smokers

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This is it in a nutshell right? I’m a right fat cunt and I wouldn’t take any offence whatsoever to that sign.

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i know i’m going to look stupid here, but can someone explain to me the cancer research posted with the missing letters?

Because it draws more attention and thought than the actual word.

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but there’s nothing more clever than that?

On one hand, it’s a good fight to be fighting - anecdotal evidence I know, but my god mum died as a direct result of doctors misdiagnosing her cancer as purely weight related for almost two years. So the focus on ~obesity is genuinely harmful especially when it’s in such a negative way.

On the other Hagen is in with some of the worst people on Twitter/earth who are probably also arguing, so they can all get tae fuck tbqh

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like when metrolink take the Qs out of stop names and say avoid the queues. i mean it doesn’t work on any level but they’re having a go?

Maybe they think it’s spelled obesaty and they’re taking the eat out.

Back on topic I don’t know who Sofie Hagen is, but she definitely seems like a lovely, decent lady from her not at all vile Twitter rants

Isn’t that more along the lines of clinical negligence rather than Hagen’s screaming about fat shaming though?

I mean, there are issues with the advert (preventable is maybe not the word I would use), but I don’t think it’s making a moral judgment. The more of these public health campaigns, the better imo.

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I don’t know the person in question, but I guess I would say that obesity is an issue that can be tackled with government policy & regulation of the food industry (and socialism, obviously). There’s also issues of class, food deserts, irregular shift patterns and long hours that stop people being able to cook proper meals. As well as a bunch of other stuff.

Basically “raising awareness around obesity” is probably the worst way by far to tackle it and is massively susceptible to unintended consequences that can exacerbate rather than improve the situation

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You come up with the answer yourself which makes you realize that actually you know obesity causes cancer and should do something about it where possible if this concerns you. It’s a psychological prompt. More so than just restating the obvious to people

Think CRUK’s idea was to raise awareness around cancer, rather than around obesity personally.

But otherwise agree, which is why “preventable” rubs me up the wrong way a little.

i understand the concept behind it, i was just convinced i was missing somthing cleverer. you know like the blood thing

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it probably comes from my own failings of never getting things and being paranoid something else is going on when it isn’t like.

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things can be true and also harmful, think that ad probably is.

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Obesity is not as much of a life choice as smoking, fucking obviously, and can be a product of much wider and nebulous factors, socioeconomic, mental health, etc etc etc.
Not all fat people reading these posters can do a ton about it, and will just be petrified and shamed further. Have a care, dadbots.

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This is interesting.

I’m reading Havi Carel’s book Illness at the moment. She uses philosophy to highlight the flaws in our perceptions of illness and how we treat people. In light of this I reckon Carel would point out that CRUK’s campaign is too naturalistic and ignores the human experience of being obese. It also feeds into the binary social narrative that obesity/cancer is simply negative vs. healthy as positive. This, too, is bad ‘old school’ thinking.

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Image result for the mask smokin

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Here’s a helpful summary of how obesity is linked to cancer. I don’t think it’s fat-shaming, I think it’s a necessary public service to make people aware of the consequences. Speaking as a fattie.

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