Phrases that don't quite sound right to you

Something being “in the offing”. That’s a phrase that doesn’t sound right to me.

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“I wonder simply wear a hat”

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how’s it hangling

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Someone from home (or maybe everyone from home) must have used “hard done to” instead of “hard done by” around me as a kid because for a while I used that as well and now hard done by, whilst correct, is cause for doubt when I hear it. Remember my ex being particularly jugdy about me saying it that incorrect way when he’s from Somerset and says “Where’s that to” (which by the way, I love, but just massively hypocritical of him)

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I remember a friend using “after a fashion” when we were at school and everyone refusing to believe it was a real saying.

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I’ve never heard this before, could you use it in a sentence please?

As a kid I thought the phrase “coming down with something” must really have been “coming up with something” because they said down in The Little Mermaid and i thought they were doing a clever sort of pun based on them living below sea level.

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they just did, after a fashion

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Me reading this bit:

:rage:

Me continuing to read:

:heart_eyes:

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It’s such a great phrase :cupid:

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Sounds like you were pretty hard done to

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It means doing something, but not very well. So you might say of a singer that’s not very good, “he was a singer, after a fashion”

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Thank you. I’m not a big fan but maybe it’ll be a grower

It’s a very awkward phrase, hence the piss taking and refusing to believe it was real until I read it in a book years later.

I’m amazed someone wouldn’t have encountered this. Must just be about the kind of books I read or maybe my granny’s slightly archaic ways of talking

There is something quite poetic about ‘after a fashion’ perfectly describing its existence as a phrase

That’s good at least

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Discussed here

Most phrases are weird if you don’t know them though.

If you’ve never encountered “half-cut” or “three sheets to the wind” you’d think them strange but they’re obviously lovely. As is “after a fashion”.

On accident
Waiting on line (as apposed to in line)
Mortar & pestle

Hunker down instead of bunker down.

Oof. Are you stateside by any chance?

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