Politics: The Long March (2020)

Kaura Luenssberg, is it

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Is there a thread in this?

Hatt Mancock?

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British citizens look much better sleeping on our streets.

Femi’s having a meltdown on twitter over his Labour membership being rejected, getting very upset that Owen Jones won’t indulge him.

Since the election I’d honestly forgotten he existed

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why did i open this fucking thread

Your word for today is ‘sequela’. Your phrase for today is ‘of fucking course Blair started all this’.

He’s bang to rights as well.

“Hey guys, I’m joining Labour so I can work to help the Lib Dems and Greens”

:man_facepalming:

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Tbh, I’ve no problem with the idea of nudging people towards things that will improve both their individual lives and society as a whole - stuff like not putting chocolate bars next to checkouts - but the idea that behavioural science was more important than epidemiology in handling a worldwide pandemic was reckless beyond belief.

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It’s an abstraction of the neoliberal belief that governments should forfeit all control and responsibility to the market. We can’t actually do anything to improve people’s lives, heavens no, so instead we’ll employ pop psychology to give them little nudges when they’re deciding what product to buy. They won’t even know we’re there.

It’s harmless in and of itself, but the problem as laid out in the article with these absurd quangos is that they become embedded and retained as official policy long after they should have faded out of existence. Until we wind up with a government attempting to ‘nudge’ the public through a pandemic, partly because the state apparatus to do anything else has been deliberately withered away.

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It’s about control without responsibility isn’t it?

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Question Time without an audience is a lot better, this is the first time I’ve been able to sit through it in years.

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Seems a bit trivial now, but

My department have been asked to provide input on a consultation about this. Unfortunately it’s going to a very naive* colleague who’s been saying things like “well it could be a good thing if we lose access to the European patent work because the Americans could say, well, UK attorneys can now practice in the US!” like it’s some kind of negotiation from positions of equal strength.

*Lib Dem

I see that ‘World Cup of stupid centrist hacks’ account is back on twitter

just seems so pointlessly nasty and kinda ableist too

Why do you think it’s ableist, out of interest? (Not trying to be provocative or anything, genuinely curious as it’s not something I’ve considered)

many disabled people are uncomfortable with the way stupid is used as a pejorative (in a similar way to e.g. dumb or idiot)

I catch myself using it all the time but it seems like quite a big oversight for an account making such pointed remarks about how awful other people’s politics are, like they haven’t considered at all that it might be considered oppressive language

I do quite regularly see fairly high profile left wing accounts calling people ‘dumb’ and not being called out

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Hadn’t even considered that if I’m being honest, but I definitely use stupid and dumb quite a bit. Will try to catch myself in the future, cheers.

Yeah I say idiot / idiotic pretty often and had never considered this at all, but it is a good point. I’m sure I will unthinkingly slip in future, but when you think about it, it is actually pretty easy to substitute such terms out for words that better convey whatever criticism you are making of someone’s views / behaviour. The one I’m a bit unsure about is “ignorant” - I think you could still use that without being deliberately offensive?

Is “ignorant” considered ableist?

ignorance is a different thing - it’s about knowledge not “intelligence”

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