Reading books in 2022

My sibling got me The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil by Stephen Collins for my birthday and I’m really enjoying it so far. Breezing through it and absolutely captivated by some of the artwork - really mundane British suburbia rendered with a storybook surrealism.

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I think I’ve read way fewer than that this year! To be fair, I kicked the year off reading Infinite Jest soooo

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:handshake:

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Yeah, your pages is probably mega

I started Jamaica Inn, only 50 or so pages in but enjoying it already :slight_smile:

It’s a good one for these dark Autumn nights imo

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I’m very much enjoying this but I have a general question. Having not read much of Murakami’s latter work apart from Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage and a couple of short story collections, is the general consensus that Kafka on the Shore is his best 21st century work?

Wind up bird chronicle for me

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yeah, I think it shits the bed a bit towards the end but it’s a fucking beautiful book overall and there’s nothing else quite like it in or out of Murakami’s oeuvre

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I couldn’t find my copy of The Castle of Otranto so I got it from my local library

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I think Kafka just edges it because I like the old man so much but Wind Up Bird is very very good.

T’is great, but I wondering more about his work this century, which I’m not particularly familiar with. Think Wind-up Bird Chronicle was published mid-90s.

I actually really enjoyed Killing Commendatore… Not quite got the depth of some of his earlier work but a really readable story that’s interesting and fun.

Couldn’t get into the short story collection he released recently

When I read this I was perpetually high, which admittedly kinda suited it, but I might dig it out again - it’d be nice to remember more than hazy drifts of imagery!

Not sure why my post lost track of itself, but that’s fairly apt! It was to @manches about The Castle of O.

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First chapter is great, I remember reading (some of?) it at university over a decade ago and only really remembering the atmosphere of it. Has that great Gothic quality (even being such an early example of Gothic fiction) where it really really reminds me of Resident Evil. As silly a comparison that is to make, just how realised the central location is with all its gloominess and secret passageways and strange spots for stranger threats to hide in and that

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Reading some Poe short stories. Just finished The Gold Bug. Well that was tedious :sweat_smile:

Do they get better? Was only really interested in The Fall of the House of Usher as the new T Kingfisher is an adaptation of it and the write up sounds exactly my sort of thing #CreepyTreesAdjacent

Might just skip to that one tbh

Haha, no I totally get the Resi reference! Just need a high tech secret lab under it all and it’d be perfect. I don’t really remember a plot, but that might be because it was quite light on stuff like that!

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Yeah, very underwhelming. Much preferred Men Without Women.

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always what I’m after from spooky / horror / gothic stuff really - less plot, more vibes

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Just finished Hamnet. Had only read one Maggie O’Farrell a long time ago and hadn’t enjoyed it. All the recommendations for this made me give it a go, glad I did. Thought it was great. Quite tender, and the scant historical detail for that part of Shakespeare’s life made it a good framework for a novel. Agnes was a v. good protagonist.

Re-reading Wyrd Sisters now ahead of the Terry Pratchett bio that’s out in a few days.

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