Rolling jazz chat


#101

listening to this now, sounding great so far, a flavour of the Lloyd Miller/ Heliocentrics album to it.

I've seen him play 30-40 times in all sorts of different bands and combinations - he's been involved in some amazing ad-hoc and improvised one-offs. Top stuff.


#102

I adore Coltrane, but for me it's the albums he made after My Favourite Things until his all-too-soon death that redefined music. My personal favourite is Live at Birdland. It's the perfect liminal album, capturing as it does the Quartet at the moment they were transitioning from post-bop to truly cosmic music. The track Your Lady is one of my all time favourite tunes by anyone. And I love his use of soprano sax, which until then had been seen as a bit of a joke instrument X


#103

the percussion interplay on this is really tasty. Love how it teases you with the horns then gets straight back to riding the drum and bass jam.

quite a lot different but this is some great Syrian jazz from a group I saw last year.


#104

got this at a chazza the other day

haven't listened but seems to be widely regarded as terrible. great cover though


#105

Hello Jazz Cats

Really uninitiated listener hear...I've tried Portico Quartet in the past and The Comet is Coming more recently and, despite enjoying them, I've not delved any further. However, just yesterday the song "Quiet Fire" by Mammal Hands came on and I was blown away, particularly by the sax. Makes me want to give jazz a real go.

So what are some good "entry level" jazz albums for someone who's taste is still largely indie rock/electronic?


#106

Try Polar Bear's album Peepers, it's not a scary one.

Also maybe the recent album from the Bad Plus with Joshua Redman is one to try on a different tip

Jazz is a broad church, there are many varieties, I know not all of it works that well for me, plenty to enjoy once you find your way into it.


#107

I really like that album! It barely qualifies as jazz, it has more of a disco/funk feel about it.

Definitely not his worst of that era of his career, that'd be 'Mr. Hands' (Err...) from a few years afterwards.


#108

Here's some strident piano, a flurry of percussion, the odd vocal bit of moroccan singing and slippery sax. A real journey!

got this trio's album Kalimba on a whim ages ago and it's excellent.


#109

my go to alb of late has been bill evans & jim hall undercurrent


#110

Listening to some Monk earlier this week reminded me of these guys. They did a whole album of Monk stuff, but I've never heard it. This is good though.


#111

this is fucking awesome

listen to your man Mingus chattering and making weird noises in the background


#112

this is some beautiful shit

MINGUS!


#113

digging this. feels like a bridge between older bop type stuff and new stuff like Gogo Penguin. The production is so goddamn punchy! Rhythm section tight as a duck's.


#114

Yes! It's so great. See also: Intermodulation, again with Jim Hall. They had a really good thing going on. Always really impressed and surprised by how full these albums sound with only piano and guitar.


#115

Thanks, Polar Bear seems prfect for the sort of level I'm looking for atm. I also gave the new GoGo Penguin a listen and really enjoyed it.


#116

PB's more recent stuff is more freeform by comparison to Peepers, but you might give it a whirl and see how you find it , I think they are amazing.

Others worth a punt are Get The Blessing (whose main guys are part of Portishead's live band), Indigo Jam Unit had a nice 2011 album called Independent, and a Norwegian band called Pixel are another one to check.

Tbh there's a shedload of amazing stuff going on, I tend to look at the other projects that eg the Polar Bear guys are involved in, it all cross-pollenates and leads to many interesting places.


#117

On that note; I noticed Shabaka Hutchings (from both Polar Bear and The Comet is Coming) has released a recent record with "The Ancestors" so it seems like a great way to explore the genre.


#118

i LOVE that record. Jim Hall is a don


#119

#120