Running thread for 2019


#241

Sorry, thought that was obvious.


#242

Oh yeah, I’ve got one of these which is good. Does anyone else do yoga to supplement their stretching? Thinking about taking it up again along with some other kind of core strength training.


#243

My plan is to start do pilates. It would have really helped in my marathon training a couple of years back.


#244

Yoga is good. There’s a stretching class at my local gym that works pretty well too.


#245

I try to do one or two yoga classes a week (vinyasa flow style) and notice quite a difference in muscle tightness when I have and haven’t been.


#246

First run in years last night (well barring a few last summer that soon fell by the wayside). Even though I’m so overweight and unfit i find it quite amazing that since I first started running about 11 years ago I never struggle as much as I did on that very first attempt. I remember starting with intervals and even a few minutes of running felt impossible whereas now I only have to stop if I get a reallt painful stitch which rarely happens. I don’t know it’s a muscle memory thing or something.

Anyway even when I was a regular runner my time never improved and I’m VERY slow. But I’m less bothered about that these days .


#247

Given your ability I’d recommend following one of the plans in Advanced Marathoning (Pete Pfitzinger). However I don’t recommend using the word marathoning in regular conversation.


#248

Oh can anyone help me with my breathing?

I have thus thing that once I think about my breathing I forget how to (this happens when not running too) but with running I start to panic a bit that I’m not actually getting oxygen and the panic is not fun.

I don’t really know how I should breath when running. Is shallow ok or should they be bigger breathes?


#249

oh man! I’ve never had this, but the common convention is (correct me if I’m wrong please) to focus on breathing in through your nose, and out through your mouth whilst running (I don’t actually do this). Getting into a rhythm doing this with your stride pattern could help?


#250

If running at a comfortable pace, yes. When you’re pushing it (running hard) then you’ll naturally switch to breathing harder and through the mouth.

@Scout, when running at a comfortable pace I try and breathe in for 4 strides and then out for the same number. By counting the steps for each breath in/out it tends to keep my breathing calm. You might find that’s a little too slow for you, so experiment a bit with 3 in/3 out etc to see what works for you.


#251

I think I probably need to do some breathing practice in general not just running. My ex did this weird thing where you almost hyperventilate on purpose but the end result is being able to hold your breath for ages, or something like that…I think Tom Cruise used it for a film. Not that I want to be able to hold my breath for ages but will be interesting to look into ways to manipulate my breathing outside of running so it’s easier to manage during. I just can’t seem to inhale once I start thinking about it, I was like a fish on land yesterday at one point. I was gasping but it felt like my lungs were stuck together inside :persevere:


#252

Do you listen to music on your run?

I find the song reptilia by the stokes a good song to keep my breathing even. When he does the guitar and its like breath in for da-da da-da da da, out for da-da da-da da da etc. It’s just 4 beats basically but I find it an easy song to regulate my breathing if I feel i’m strugglng


#253

I do indeed. I’ll try that!


#254

Oh thanks, I’ll have a look into that. I try not to talk about running too much (in the real world) as it’s one of my solitary pursuits so hopefully that won’t slip into conversation.


#255

I really like that book, as well. Others worth reading for general background advice would be Hal Higdon (and check out his website for training plans). Jeff Guadette is good (you can get email tips from him without signing up to a training plan). Build Your Running Body by Pete Magill has lots of good stretches, details of specific exercises/different types of run, but I’m not sure about his plans, he had me doing my slow runs very very slowly (my current training plan has them faster and I’m really seeing a difference).

Off the top of my head, main thing to worry about and main difference from halves is hitting the wall; you need to go through it to see what it’s like, so make sure your training plan gets you out to 20 miles or so.


#256

Insanity. I’m not even a runner!

https://www.grough.co.uk/magazine/2019/01/16/jasmin-paris-celebrates-as-first-woman-to-win-spine-race-and-smashes-course-record


#257

The 35-year-old athlete said she is juggling her ultrarunning with being a parent, and is expressing breast milk during the race.

Female ultrarunners: full-on hardcore.
Seems like the longer the race, the better women do - see also Courtney Dauwalter winning the Moab 240 (238 miles in the Utah desert) by 10 hours: https://trailrunnermag.com/people/news/courtney-dauwalter-wins-moab-240.html


#258

She was being interviewed on BBC news 5 mins ago. She said that yesterday on the final leg she was falling asleep and hallucinating while she was running/walking!
Incredible lady!!


#259

It’s beyond running… the mental toughness required to keep moving, deal with the weather conditions, navigate solo through the night and keep your shit together on 4hrs sleep for over 3 days of racing is kinda hard to comprehend.

She also holds the outright record for the Ramsay Round and has done one of the fastest ever Bob Graham Rounds. The latter is particularly impressive given the calibre of runners who’ve had a crack at it over the years.


#260

:scream::scream::scream::scream:

the closest thing I have to compare to is a 600km bike ride, but I got 4 hours sleep and cycling is very very easy compared to running, so I just can’t even

How to you even begin to realise you can do stuff like that? It’s like superhuman.