Set times


#81

I can see both sides to it although the way the no set times lot are going on about it is making me lose sympathy for their argument. Fuck those guys.

What it has meant though is that gig queues are a thing again! Massive queues recently for Jon Hopkins, death grips and teenage fanclub because everyone turns up right around the same time. I don’t think two of those gigs even had a support act so hey ho.


#82

What a depressing post


#83

No memory of that quote up there but apologies, no idea what I was thinking? Dalston was awful then and is awful now (and I never lived there??).


#84

Massive queues = a consequence of increased/more thorough security checks, no?


#85

The queues were big for TF but my colleague got in (on night one) for the start of the set after getting there 15 minutes before they started. No support but the first set started around the time the support would have been on in anyway. It was noticeably quicker to get in for the other nights.


#86

Why? I’ve noticed things go full circle with gigs, used to be the youngest there, eventually became the oldest, weirdly now seem to be about the average age at most things I go to. I think for these gigs the promoters should recognise their audience aren’t students who can do/want late nights all the time. As for minimal support acts, depends on the headliner, but a lot of the bands I go and see are ones I’ve liked 15+ years, it’s less likely they are gonna come up with appropriate support acts, I didn’t say no support it’s just when there are multiple.

If it is a newer band with a young audience promoters should cater for them, if it is an older crowd who would appreciate not getting home gone midnight on a weeknight then promoters should cater for them. That’s not depressing it is practical. I go to a lot of gigs but would definitely go to more if finish by 10 was the standard


#87

I quite like it because I like being within the first three rows for any gig, and it allows you to do the calculation to get there and be able to do so.

Band are on at 20:20
Other people will say to each other “Meet you there at 20:00”
You turn up 19:55
Job done


#88

Something about 20:20 vision


#89

That made me chuckle vision


#90

They could’ve made their point if they’d just said always investigate the support bands and go see them if you can. Wouldn’t have got as many clicks tho…


#91

I think it’s a bit strange to cordon off events to certain demographics. I don’t particularly enjoy knowing every single member of a crowd is a Belle and Sebastian fan. Best gigs are when there’s a mixture.

It also feels like we’re talking as music as a mundane capitalistic pursuit, like doing the weekly shopping. I think it should be elevated above that and you have to make the effort to fit it in, not the other way round


#92

Seems a tad presumptuous and egocentric.

“THIS IS ART! IT WILL NOT CONFORM TO YOUR LIFE, YOU MUST CONFORM TO ITS.

*that’ll be £22.50, please”


#93

going to gigs doesn’t exist as a leisure or artistic activity outside the reality of capitalism though. In an ideal world someone would be able to say sorry I’m going in late to work tomorrow cause i have a gig tonight and will need to get a night bus home etc.

Thats kinda the nature of capitalism… it puts in place material constraints that stop us being able to enjoy art


#94

When I started going to gigs, I sometimes arrived BEFORE the doors opened. What a waste of life.


#95

Dunno, I do make the effort, go to about a gig a week where I get home about 1am, I’d just prefer to get home earlier. I think promoters will have a rough idea of their average audience and should adapt a bit rather than stick to the conventional times for no reason (worst is when it is on a Sunday and doors are still 8). I think the most important thing is good attendance so bands have an audience, making it easier for the audience to attend is the way to go.

Guess a lot of it has to do with venues making more from alcohol than tickets


#96

I go to a lot of gigs on my own and it’s great to know times. I usually catch the support but I don’t want to spend a full hour at the venue waiting for the first slot to get on stage. Granted it seems like venues are generally better now about not having a huge gap between doors opening and first support.

Also if you know the time the headliner is in, you can make a very good guess about when they’ll finish. Makes it much easier to plan public transport and getting back. For those of us who don’t drive that can be a godsend.

On that note, if gigs finished earlier I’d go to a hell of a lot more, because I’d go to nearby cities and then get the last train home. Usually gigs finish around the time that trains stop, which is quite frustrating when paying for a place to spend the night is expensive!


#97

I walk past the o2 academy here on the way to work, some young people were there at 7am the other week.


#98

Thing is, at that age I didn’t even drink. I just… stood there. Waiting. And then got in and stood there. Waiting. smh


#99

So much ^this. I want set times specifically to catch the support act with minimal waiting.


#100

Had to leave Orcas at Café Oto just after they came on so I could get home :cry: (did get to see all of Benoît Pioulard’s solo set which was good, but the amount of dead space between sets was ridiculous).

Worst one for late starts for me was Troubles playing a Sonic Cathedral night and coming on at 11pm, I had to leave at 11:05 :-1: (they were the best live band and only played a tiny amount of shows)