Slang for currency

Why do you think there’s so much slang for money? Why do some currencies have do many more variants than others? Are there any slang terms for Euros, or is this a thing of the past passed down the generations? Do you refer to currency in ways others may not be familiar with?

When referring to the currency I’m most familiar with
  • I use the official terminology
  • I use the most common terminology
  • I use slang
  • I use my own terminology which most people wouldn’t recognise
  • Other

0 voters

When referring to other currencies
  • I use the official terminology
  • I use the most common terminology
  • I use slang
  • I use my own terminology which most people wouldn’t recognise
  • Other

0 voters

Ah shit I posted too soon and forgot to put the words in

Probably say quid a lot.

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Cash

Readies

Wongaaa

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Currency!

Surely you don’t say it’s gonna cost 5 wonga!

Or do you?

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There’s only three things I hate in this world:

i) Americans calling everything dollars;
ii) people calling loose change shrapnel; and
c) the Dutch

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Yeah, quid and p, rather than pound and pence.

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It’s quite annoying that there are so many countries that have their own dollars.

Thanks @marckee common sense prevails.

Would you say quid if you were talking to someone in a formal context?

See also, Lira and Krona.

Got some dosh mush?

Dollah Dollah bill ya’ll.

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This thread was brought to you by the sudden realisation that I don’t know of any slang terms for Euros and wondering if that’s just because I don’t know of them or if it’s because it’s a thing of the past or if it’s because the terms are not in English so don’t have the same spread in my bubble.

I also call euros quids. Sorry.

This is simultaneously surprising and enlightening, feels a bit at it too, but in a way that I can only see as light hearted

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dough

They are pretty much one for one now so I just say 5 quids meaning 5 euro.

I don’t really like the term euro though.

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Pounds = pints
Dollars = doldrums
Euros = your opas
Yen = yengas
Franc = frankies
Dinar = dinners
Rial = realies
Won = winners
Rimbi = rimmers

Etc, etc

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In work meetings we’d use ‘pounds’, eg “That will add 100,000 pounds to the budget.”

Outside of that, I’d use quid if it was a round figure, eg “Ten quid” or “25p”, but if it was a mixture of denominations, I’d use pound, eg “five pound fifty”.

I can’t think of any logic behind the latter, other than it sounds less odd when you say it out loud.

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