The Biggest Personal Fall From Grace

Metallica. First five albums are possibly the best run of metal albums ever, maybe only challenged by Black Sabbath’s (shut up, they are metal) own first five releases. They even managed what very few metal bands manage which is that they fundamentally changed their sound over the course of those album (while also almost single-handedly inventing a new genre in the process).

Everything beyond those five albums has been unlistenable muck. Plus it became increasingly apparent that both Lars Ulrich and James Hetfield are awful, awful people. Plus Napster…

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The thing about Oasis was that they weren’t doing anything new at all - taking Teenage Fanclub’s sound and throwing some obvious, stolen melodies in, the end result being really immediate - but they were also great value in interviews and so managed to get cover after cover in the NME, Melody Maker etc.

For me, the last song I really loved when they put it out was Some Might Say, which was only a year after their debut, although I persevered through the second album. When I first heard ‘D’you Know What I Mean?’ I really couldn’t be arsed…just as they couldn’t.

There was a minor improvement when they started ripping off The Beta Band, but the songs were basically still nursery rhymes.

yeah its muse

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Personally I wouldn’t say any band I love has tainted their early work by releasing mediocre / crap stuff subsequently. I’ll still happily listen to the first two albums by Oasis, Sterephonics, KOL, Muse, Bloc Party etc and just avoid all the later rubbish. Undecided on Arcade Fire. Radiohead and The National are still producing great music and live shows.

The only way a band would be able to taint their work for me would be something non-musical, not necessarily as extreme as Ian Watkins.

Pinegrove are currently in limbo for me for this reason. Obviously nothing as bad as Ian Watkins is going to come out of it, but it’s hard to overcome the huge, unshifting grey area hanging over them at the moment.

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NIN

got into them in '98 or '99 in the lead up to the fragile, bought it on the day of release. parents wouldn’t let me go to glastonbury '00 to see them and i was livid. over the next few years collected every halo and a bunch of other rarities, had a bit of a NIN shrine in my room. finally got to see them two nights at the astoria in 2005, both good shows, and then saw them again in manchester a year or so later and that was good too.

and then… suddenly just stopped caring basically overnight. sold all my rare swag for loads of money on ebay. would sometimes give a cursory listen to new stuff they put out but just found it embarrassing and cringey. really can’t understand what i saw in them now.

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Brand New. Last years revelations have ruined them for me; can’t bring myself to listen to anything by them now. A real shame as musically they were never short of stunning

EDIT: This doesn’t really fit the definition but…

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I was a huge NIN fan in my teens. Saw them in '91 :scream: supporting Guns N Roses at Wembley Stadium and even in those less than auspicious surroundings they were unlike anything I knew at that time. A mate bought Pretty Hate Machine and made cassette copies for our entire social circle :bowing_man: Broken was the second CD I ever bought (after Nirvana’s Lithium single) and it fair blew my head off. Still think it’s comfortably their high water mark. Unlike most fans, I thought that The Downward Spiral was a huge step down. I think the reason is that is was at this point that he started getting a bit try hardy with the lyrics and it all got a bit silly for me. Enjoyed The Fragile when it came out, but mostly for the instrumental stuff. From With Teeth onwards they’ve pretty much just sounded like a lite-industrial version of The Foo Fighters to me. Can still listen to the instrumental stuff however as a result. Might stick Ghosts I-IV on in a bit actually.

I was at one of those Astoria gigs :+1: . Was good…

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the lyrics got a bit silly after pretty hate machine? :rofl:

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Pretty Hate Machine was fairly poppy and inoffensive lyrically - certainly didn’t feature stuff like ’ I want to fuck you like an animal’ (plus all the associated holocaust images during the live shows and snuff film videos and Sharon Tate house recordings and the like). For me, the best shock rock has an element of humour underlying it - Trent’s version seemed thoroughly joyless…

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Ghosts I-IV is an amazing body of work. Should’ve stopped there really.

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Would have definitely agreed with this post album 3 but feel they redeemed themselves slightly on last year’s record

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I would also still stand by the phonics debut,

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Was going to be kind and say EN might just be a blip, but then remembered Reflektor was rubbish too. A true decline.

Can’t really understand being into the first 3 and not this one.

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Agree. This Is Happening was a big disappointment for me, but American Dream was a great return to form :+1:

I once thought bloc party were the most exciting band around and were one of my very favourites. Then I heard their terrible subsequent albums and never listened to them again.

Heard helicopter somewhere the other day though and it still sounded great.

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Mark Kozelek

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Probably The White Stripes as I was obsessed as a teen, and now only listen occasionally.

Not the biggest, but Father John Misty and The War on Drugs spring to mind also. Really liked their first two albums and now cannot stand either of them.

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Korn, I mean in fairness this probably coincided with me moving further away from nu-metal but the more recent stuff is borderline parodic.

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