The Book Thread Of Year '19

books

#41

My respect for librarians stems from the fact that they used to keep a list of what Terry Pratchett books I’d already taken out when I was a kid so they could be accurate with their recommending


#42

Top librarianing there. I wonder if they ever pre-emptively ordered ones in for you…


#43

Done some good reading so far this year.

Finished Murakami’s Men Without Women (a mixed bag) and A Wild Sheep Chase (alright), finished Lily Allen’s My Thoughts Exactly (genuinely excellent). Also read The Metamorphosis for the first time last night, it’s decent.

Now reading War and Peace (slowly), one of Little Alex Horne’s books cos I love him, and finally The Glass Room. Have to read this as I’m going to the world premiere of the film in March, as it’s set in (and was filmed in) this place https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villa_Tugendhat. It’s okay so far but only 25% in.


#44

A Wild Sheep Chase is one of my favourites. I do wonder though, if that’s because it’s one of the earliest Murakami novels I read. There’s definitely an overkill threshold with his work (didn’t read any Murakami last year for that very reason, so looking forward to getting into Men Without Women this year)


#45

I’ve read six or seven Murakami books since discovering him about six months ago :joy: Very possible that I’m just burnt out with his style so I’ll give it a break for a while and read other stuff.

After Dark was the first one I read and I adored it, but judging by reviews it might just be because it was my first one.

Kafka is still my favourite, but haven’t read The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle yet and that seems to be a lot of people’s favourite (round these parts at least)


#46

SAME!

Wind-Up Bird is very good, it’s definitely him stepping out of his comfort zone a bit more, though not to the extent that I remember one Guardian article proclaimed it did: I remember the writer said something like “you won’t find whimsical musings on cats and spaghetti here” despite the fact that the opening bit is probably the most cats and spaghetti-heavy thing he ever wrote


#47

Had a re-read of Cormac McCarthy books in December, culminating with The Road in preparation for 2019.
Reading The Vatican Cellars by André Gide now. Enjoyed the first two parts a lorra lot.


#48

JUUUUUKEEEE!!!


#49

Villa Tughat sounds like a very niche film full of adult content.


#50

I’m re-reading Wind Up Bird this year.


#51

:sunglasses:


#52

Kind of splitting my time between a few books but I’m mostly reading Silvia Federici’s Revolution at Point Zero which is a collection of essays largely rooted in marxist-feminism and I guess more general concepts around the refusal of work, modern global capitalism etc.

Also reading the K-Punk a compilation of essays, articles and some unfinished pieces by the late Mark Fisher, enjoyable but fairly bittersweet given I don’t think there’s been a cultural critic I identify with more.


#53

It was quite heartening that Repeater posted a message saying the first print run had been totally sold a lot quicker than they expected. I agree a lot with your last point, just in terms of having an outlook that’s more nuanced than what I associate with a lot of cultural criticism.


#54

That Will Carruthers book is brilliant. Will be rereading that at some point.


#55

@Jeremys_Iron’s latest venture


#56

Here’s my currently reading/to read pile. Am partway through a lot of these. Need more music books by female authors though.


#57

Just read Melmoth by Sarah Perry which I got for Christmas. I liked it but didn’t feel as into the characters as I wanted to be.

Got Our House as an audible to start listening to on the commute.

Going to start Conversations with friends this afternoon as some other bugger has reserved it so it has to be back at the library by Friday.


#58

Joanna Demers is pretty interesting iirc if you’re interested in more academic-ish music books


#59

Have just started H.G. Wells’ The Invisible Man, which I’m really enjoying.


#60

Cool, will have a look for her books! Thanks!