📷 The Photography Thread

I think I’m 6.8% happy with these. colours probs weird from being tester printed stuff then snapped with my phone. I take very on brand photos.

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what is this? looks great.

just trying to put together a little book thing

very nice - would love to do something similar at some point

Bee.

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Took my underwater housing for my digi compact away on holiday with me, didn’t I lads?

It’s either this one, or the next size up, but an absolute steal - much cheaper than buying a dedicated underwater camera, and much better image quality (in my experience)

Hey gang. Looking at getting into this shit. As a complete novice where would be the best starting points in terms of camera, software, lenses, any books worth picking up etc.
Everything seems to suggest one of the nikon d3xxx series is a decent starting point but yeah, some non-Bank breaking pointers would be v welcome (also loads of great stuff itt)

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second this, my phone is ok cos I’m learning how to frame shots and that but I’m gonna need a proper camera soon i reckon

Here’s a heathen opinion. If you are only vaguely invested in photography, think very carefully about whether you will actually transport a big camera body around (and multiple lenses).

I got big into photography a couple of years before good camera phones were a thing, and splashed out on a dslr. For the last three years at least it has languished in a drawer.

My camera phone takes brilliant photos - and if you’re more interested in composition of the scene itself and shooting ‘in the moment’ rather than on super high quality, you’d do fine with one of the better camera phones. I have a Huawei P30 (recently upgraded from iPhone X) and its superb.

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Best thing to do is identify your budget and whatnot is that you want to regularly take photos of then go from there.

Plenty of people would make this kind of recommendation- ‘the best camera for you is the one you’ll take with you’.

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ya my camera phone is okay but if i can frame something well and add the right processing fx sometimes i get pretty sweet results

I would counter this opinion (with love) to say that if you’re interested in learning the craft of photography then it’s essential to get yourself a decent camera, at least one with manual ISO, aperture, shutter speeds, white balance, maybe even the option of flat colour profiles.

I’d start out a with decent kit zoom lens (24-70) or similar and then think about getting yourself a fast prime down the line when you’re into the swing of it. A zoom lens would allow versatility and being able to change your composition without physically moving. A lot of zoom lenses go down to F4.0 which is still enough for you to get a bit of shallow depth of field to play around with. Tilts is right that you want to be able to pick up and go and not be lugging around kgs worth of kit or faffing about with lenses to begin with.

My experience is that Canon DSLRs are great for beginners as the layout is user friendly. a 5D mark ii / mark iii would be great but it depends what counts for you as breaking the bank. Mark II is similar price to Nikon D3.

Canon is great because you can get a lot of old vintage lenses adapted to fit them which saves you mega bucks - I have some Contax / Zeiss prime lenses that cost about £200 a pop and the image quality is sublime and they’re very ‘fast’ (fast is camera lingo for when the aperture goes really low which allows you to achieve maximum shallow depth of field.)

I personally have no experience with Nikon but I’m also a fan of the philosophy that the best camera is the one you have in your hands.

Software - Photoshop is obviously great but it’s so pro that it can be a little bit confusing at first. But it wouldnt take too long to get used to the layout and learn how to adjust the levels / colours in your photos. Aperture also good.

Wouldnt say theres any essential books I’ve encountered that are much better than watching a few youtube tutorials on how to operate the camera and then practicing as much as possible.

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This is super advice.

On a side note, even though my dslr is relegated to a drawer, I also started collecting analog cameras on the cheap from charity shops… My Praktica MTL5B gets a lot of love because there is such a joy and surprise in seeing what you’ve created on film. Expensive hobby, mind.

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This is something I used to love too. The joy of developing film is hard to beat. But as you say, expensive hobby, and one I’ve had to relegate for the time being. I did a couple of long trips when I was younger using only film and getting it all developed in one go at the end was such a lovely experience.

Got given a Penti II for Christmas which I’m constantly putting off trying out due to the expense and also having to manually load 35mm film into two rapid cassettes. Maybe one day I’ll have my own darkroom…

Did a trip to the States a couple of years ago and didn’t realise I’d accidentally been given film that was intended for projector slides in it but some of the colours it produced were amazing:

photoacci

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I think the phone / ‘proper’ camera thing depends a bit on the kind of photos you want to take? The new iPhones have 50mm lenses inside them? which is alright but most camera phones are about 28mm or something?

A few odd shots from earlier in the year:



![DSCF5414-2|690x460]
(upload://bt5B2ezGg1QuJjZh5bLrmzkYz8e.jpeg)


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You can call it an expensive hobby, but a roll of film is a fiver if you buy online, and my developing is only a fiver because I scan at home. That’s a couple of pints. Yeah, it’s a tenner more than you’d have spent with digital, but it’s a lot cheaper than some hobbies. :slight_smile:

I got lucky with the weather and did a shoot at golden hour with epic clouds:

(Looks a lot better bigger)

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