What to do in Sunderland

I’m sure google will have the answers.

I think this is the latest address:

You must try the cheesy chips

Milks off!

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Heard theres a fantastic travel service where you can quickly and conveniently go to Newcastle instead

Go to Hull

Ok…so what should I do in Newcastle this saturday, other than eat curry in Bigg Market…?

Get the Metro to Sunderland

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Get on the train to Edinburgh, then quickly get on another train to Glasgow.

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By the way, good luck with the north run

Don’t eat curry in the Bigg Market.

How long are you up there for, and do you think you’ll be up for a bit of walking?

I’m only really there for Saturday during the daytime, as i’m at a family meal on friday night and will be running the GNR and then getting the train home shortly afterwards.

Are you a football fan? Sunderland are playing at home on Sat afternoon.

Can you get tickets on the door?

Why not take your old man with you and fall out over Brexit in a cafe.

The quayside will have lots of events going on (the mini-mile stuff etc), so if you want a wander around there, there will be things to keep you entertained.

Nestor posted some recommendations in another thread:

and here’s something I put together a year or two back:

  1. Places to Visit:

1.a City Centre (from Haymarket down to the Station):

It’s worth having just a general wander around the city centre – it’s small and compact and has some lovely streets and squares, the Grainger Market and Central Arcade. There’s a good selection of shops and cafes and tea rooms, and High Bridge Street and Pink Lane have cool little record and clothes shops too. If it’s raining, a visit to the Hancock Museum or Hatton Gallery up by the university, the Laing Art Gallery by the Central Library, the Discovery Museum in the West End or the Lit&Phil library by the station will while away a couple of hours, or a trip to the Tyneside cinema and its cafes and tea rooms will get you out of the cold.

1.b Quayside:

Again, a wander along here affords great views of Newcastle, Gateshead and their bridges. There’s a Sunday market on the Newcastle side and the Millennium Bridge has info on when it is tilting here: http://www.gateshead.gov.uk/Leisure%20and%20Culture/attractions/bridge/Home.aspx
The Baltic and Music Centre are free to wander around – make sure that you go up to the top of the Baltic to the viewing platform.
If you want to wander around some old buildings then the Castle Keep (and nearby Black Gate) are interesting, with the Keep offering excellent view of the city from its roof, and Bessie Surtees’ house is a fine example of Jacobean merchant architecture.

1.c Beyond the city centre:

As well as the excellent pubs (see below), the Ouseburn and the valley up to Jesmond Dene has lots of other places of interest. I’d start on a sunny morning at the top end of Jesmond Dene, and walk down the valley through the petting zoo, on to Armstrong Park and Heaton Park, and then pop into one of the cafes on Heaton Road (Cafe One20, Butterfly Cabinet or Sky Apple Cafe) for a bit to eat, before heading to the Biscuit Factory, under the Byker Bridges and down into the Ouseburn. While in the Ouseburn I’d get a late lunch in one of the pubs and hang around there for the rest of the afternoon, maybe popping into Seven Stories or some of the studios if I was feeling energetic, before going down to the Quayside.

  1. Going out:
    If you’re going out for drinks, I’d to avoid the Bigg Market, The Gate (the entertainment complex up near the top of the Bigg Market) and Osborne Road in Jesmond (full of sloaney students). Oh, and don’t go to The Botanist.
    There are now lots of excellent beer pubs in Newcastle, and many of these do food. It’s been a couple of years since I was up in Newcastle for a night out, so I’ve asked a few friends for their recent recommendations. Hopefully this picks up the best of what’s there these days:

2.a City Centre:

Pani’s – lovely little Italian restaurant. Dirt cheap.
Bierrex – Good beers and does decent food too
Crown Posada – tiny pub, but lovely
Bodega – out on the West Road, but terrific
Broad Chare – good gastropub
The Forth – does good food too
House Of Tides – excellent top-end (for Newcastle, at least) restaurant
Tokyo – bit wanky, but good music on the terrace
Pleased To Meet You – good beers and gin.
Head Of Steam – downstairs is great for dancing beyond normal pub hours without going to a club. The toilets can be horrific though.
Trent House – a little bit out of the way, but a cracking pub
Dat Bar – decent, if rather shameless attempt to ape London beer, pizza and burger places
Lyndsay’s To Go – tasty seafood (I’ve not tried this one, obviously, but it’s meant to be great)
Blackfriars – good lunch deals.
Quilliams – excellent Tea House.
Bohemian - good veggie/vegan food
Blake’s Coffee House – more of an old style tea room. It gets VERY busy with old ladies who have just been to Fenwicks and the pre-Theatre Royal crowd.
Nudo – excellent cheap noodle and sushi place.
Scrumpy Willow & the Singing Kettle – organic, vegetarian and vegan cafe and restaurant. Good, if you don’t mind slightly hungover hippies.
Cosmic Ballroom – tiny little club that has excellent DJs.
The Cut – excellent little club. As with the Cosmic Ballroom, check listings to see who’s on what night.

2.b Quayside:

Quay Ingredient – gets pretty busy these days though
The Bridge Tavern – loads of beers
Hop & Cleaver – good food
Redhouse – decent pies, quite pricey, tends to cater for tourists.

2.c Ouseburn:

Cumberland Arms – ale and folk music
Cluny – great venue, good pub, excellent burgers
Tanners Arms – at the top of Byker Bridge, a good place to start for a Ouseburn crawl
The Tyne – good outdoor space if they’ve got music on too.
Free Trade Inn – excellent views, wonderfully shabby.
Ernest – excellent flatbreads during the day, beer and dancing during the night.
The Bake – bit of a walk into Byker, but very cheap Lebanese food.
Cook House – local restaurant in some shipping containers

  1. Further afield:

Assuming you’ve not got a car, I’d leave off exploring Hardrian’s Wall (The stretch between Housesteads and Chesters Forts is the best for a walk on a sunny day), or the Northumbrian Coast (Bamburgh Castle, Warkworth, Craster, Holy Island, Alnmouth, Alnwick Castle and Gardens and Druridge Bay are all worth a visit), but if you fancy getting out of the city, you can catch the Metro out to Tynemouth – the beach, priory and Sunday market are a nice day out. The Angel Of The North isn’t too far away in Gateshead, but it can be tricky to get to if you’re relying on public transport, and the same goes for Saltwell Park, which on a sunny day is a lovely spot.

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Not sure. They are in the Championship now, so I guess it won’t be a sell out.
Look up their website.

Come off it, marckee, he’ll have to leave Sunderland by the time he’s read all that.

How did the run go??

1h47m42s! Very chuffed and very chafed.