Whisk(e)y Thread

Thanks!

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New to me, just saw it and bought it… not tried yet. Also it’s got a glass stopper which is unusual

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Christmas haul - both big sherry cask numbers. About to crack open the GlenDronach, which I don’t remember having tried before.

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I’m on board with that

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Goodbye Scotland, hello Ireland

Time for a new bottle

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Another new bottle. Irish, again.

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How Emmerdale of you

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If you’re into that sort of thing, then their gin is very good too

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I shall investigate, although unlike whiskey, gin is only used for cocktails, so a bit less concerned about how good it tastes.

Nearly finished a 12 year Glendronach. Lovely…

Tell you what, for £35 or whatever, this is pretty great stuff

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It’s gonna be particularly good in 2030/31 cos I’ll have made a decent fraction of it :wink:

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Wow, didn’t realise you actually made this stuff!

Have only dipped in and out of this thread occasionally and thought you were just super knowledgeable about whiskey.

Will make sure I get some more on about 10 years time {and probably in the intervening years as well}

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i don’t make it any more & work elsewhere in the company now (loved making it, but the day-evening-night shift life wasn’t for me)

but yeah, it’s a banging whisky for the price, enjoy :slight_smile:

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why do you need a night-shift to make whisky? I was always under the impression it was:

boil up some stuff
distill it
put in in a barrel
leave it for 8 years

reckon i could get that done in my lunch hour and then just chill for a decade :sweat_smile:

(genuine question, no obligation to answer!)

And this is why you’re not a successful whisky maker

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when I went to Bushmills and it looked like Cape Carneveral in there with all the control panels and buttons i was very confused

basically because to maximise production and hence $$$ most (?) distilleries make the stuff 24 hours a day (and often 7 days a week). For us, the entire process from start to finish (i.e. the mashing and distilling) took 7ish hours, so we usually got 3 batches done a day, or roughly one per shift (though timing reasons meant it was very rare that you started and finished a batch yourself, usually you just picked up where the previous stillperson was in the process and carried on from there)

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As it happens, one of my nicknames at school was Milhouse :see_no_evil:

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