Who's you're favourite anti-racist white person from the past?

Upon being told that his mixed race baseball team couldn’t play, because his best friend was African-American, the 12 year old Clark Gable said, ‘OK, then we don’t play.’

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Tempted to say Brando, but in other ways he was probably a bit of a twat.

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Trudy from The Office.

Atticus Finch then

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I take it you haven’t read Go Set A Watchman

Properly dredging up memories of primary school with this one

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Not yet. I hear he turns out to be something of a bigot…

It’s a bit more nuanced than that. I won’t spoil it.

I highly recommend it though. It’s a superb companion piece that really gave me a better understanding of To Kill A Mockingbird

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He chucks a stone at a mockingbird and calls it a ‘feathery little prick’

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Imagine calling your kid Civil if that was your surname, ffs.

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A slightly leftfield one maybe is Peter Norman. The Austrailian athlete that supported Tommy Smith and John Carlos in their Black Panther salute during the Olympic Ceremony in 1968. It cost him his athletic career but gained him the respect of generations. Brave, selfless man.

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red auerbach was cool

Auerbach was known for his love for cigar smoking. Because Red made his victory cigars a cult in the 1960s, Boston restaurants would often say “no cigar or pipe smoking, except for Red Auerbach”.[11] In addition, Auerbach was well known for his love of Chinese food. In an interview shortly before his death, he explained that since the 1950s, Chinese takeout was the most convenient nutrition: back then, NBA teams travelled on regular flights and had a tight time schedule, so filling up the stomach with heavier non-Chinese food meant wasting time and risking travel-sickness. Over the years, Auerbach became so fond of this food that he even became a part-owner of a Chinese restaurant in Boston.[12] Despite a heart operation, he remained active in his 80s, playing racquetball and making frequent public appearances.

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I was going to throw Norman into the hat as well. Another suggestion would be Luz Long, the German long-jumper who publicly befriended Jesse Owens at the 1936 Olympics

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Not one specific person, The early guys of the IWW. (around 1900)

“All who toil, be they young or old, male or female, skilled or unskilled, born here or abroad, are welcomed in the ranks of the One Big Union.”

If you are a wage worker, you are welcome in the IWW halls, no matter what your color. By this you may see that the IWW is not a white man’s union, not a black man’s union, not a red man’s union, but a workingman’s union. All of the working class in one big union."

“They organized migratory workers, of which there were countless millions — not just farmworkers, but also timber workers and the like. They organized domestic workers and [immigrants regardless of legal status] They wanted everyone who was not a boss to be in.”

Meanwhile, all the other American trade/craft unions were excluding non-white workers and lobbied government to introduce laws like the Chinese Exclusion Act (straight up banning Chinese people from America) + the unions themselves would stoke workers fears about race and immigrations impact on their jobs and the lowering of wages (…). That sort of stuff’s never stopped and there’s African American workers in the US who still talk about unions being white only, self serving and closed off to them.

Stuff like this came from the leader of the American Socialist Party at the time:

“the willful importation of cheap foreign labor calculated to destroy labor organizations, to lower the standard of living of the working class, and to retard the ultimate realization of socialism.”… “Chinese and Japanese workers play that role today, as does the yellow race in general.” boo

but

“There is only one labour organisation in the United States that admits the coloured worker on a footing of absolute equality with the white — the Industrial Workers of the World.”

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And of course, George Formby refused to do so as well.

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The story:

For Formby himself was no racist. There’s a great story from 1946 when he toured the pre-Apartheid South Africa with Beryl. They instantly made an impression by refusing to play racially-segregated venues. This came to a head when Formby embraced a young black audience member who had presented Beryl with a box of chocolates. The incident came to the attention of National Party leader Daniel François Malan (who later introduced apartheid). Malan had the arrogance to phone the indomitable Beryl to complain about the incident and was perfectly put in his place. Beryl replied, “Why don’t you piss off you horrible little man?” A perfect riposte to the creep and his the hateful system that was then emerging in South Africa.

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