Words / phrases that will die a death when the generations above us are all dead

“And back to Blighty in time for breakfast!”

A guy actually said this to me when I was cycling in France last month.

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I used to think it was “apeth”. Like some kind of ape. I have heard others assumed the same too. In a way it has already died, amongst the ignorant like me anyway.

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My granny would say it. She’s long gone though. As a little kid I also heard it as “daft apeth” though I have no idea for real what it meant.

Googling seems to suggest that it would be spelled “apeth” but was originally short for “ha’penny worth”.

All contactless nowadays, isn’t it.

Joke?

“in this day and age”

“new Vera Lynn album”

daft begger

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There are stacks of Scottish words and expressions which my gran and my mother would use in everyday conversation, which I understand but would never use. Not sure if things like “ben the scullery” are actually dying out or if I’m just a soulless, aspirational, mid-Atlantic tosspot who’s tried to forget his past in the pursuit of success but will eventually learn an important life lesson from a bonnie, doon-tae-Earth, wee Scotch lassie.

Good gad!

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Gordon Bennett!

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As do I. Being a naturally sweary person, coming up with inoffensive alternatives to use in front of the kids has been an unexpected delight of parenthood.

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tre_cools_fiddlesticks

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Holibobs can do one.

I’ll have your guts for garters.

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Very good example.